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The position and status of Jews in Europe worsened in the years 1933-1945.

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Introduction

The position and status of Jews in Europe worsened in the years 1933-1945, due to the following observations. The hatred shown towards the Jews started in the Roman age and early Christian era. Then, around 7% of the population were Jews. Even this early, people were feeling irritable towards the Jews, as they were not 'Honouring the official Gods of the Empire'. By 313AD, Christianity (known as Xianity) had become the most important religion. Tolerance of the Jews then became impossible. Many myths about the Jews began early and carried on into the early C20th. One myth was that Jews were said to be murderers of the Xian communities. They were said to use their blood in ceremonial rituals. These myths worsened the status and position of the Jews considerably in the C19th and C20th. ...read more.

Middle

From its birth the Nazis campaigned against the Jews. However, many people didn't believe that they would act on their anti-Jewish feelings. However, within days of taking power the Nazis made their intentions obvious by Boycott of Jewish businesses. For the first two years of their rule, there was little organised persecution of the Jews. In 1935, Hitler had achieved his initial aims of a stronger position. Despite the extremely bad treatment of Jews in the 1930's, many Jews stayed in Germany because other Jews in other countries were treated the same, and many Jews didn't believe that the Nazis would do much else to affect them. The Jews didn't believe that they could achieve total extermination of the Jews in Germany. People believe that the following explanations were given as to why the Nazis did this to the Jews: the camp guards weren't human, they did not regard the captured 'lower class' as humans, ...read more.

Conclusion

People had no idea as to how badly the Jews were getting treated and so did not oppose Hitler or the Jews. People however who later knew about the things that happened in the camps, did not help as the fear for the Nazis and the power that they had was too great. In 1940, Jews were forced to move into Ghettos. Walls were built to separate them from the rest of the city. Many people caught Typhus. Anyone who left the Ghetto was executed. Altogether over half a million Jews died in the Ghettos. Forced to live in sub-human conditions, they became weak and undernourished. In the end many Jews did gain the look Nazi propaganda often portrayed them as - sub-humans. This only made it easier for some people to take part in the dreadful treatment of the Jews, as some people convinced themselves, with the help of the Nazis, that the Jews they were dealing with were not humans. ...read more.

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