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the role of women in hitler's Germany

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Introduction

The role of women in Hitler's Germany The role of women changed when Hitler came to power. Before they would have had a job and get paid but Hitler changed that. Women were sacked and told to stay at home and clean, their job was to clean, shop and to be mothers. Hitler believed that a woman's role in the world was not to work but to stay at home. They were to keep tidy decent home and to be a good mother to as many children as possible. Women were to marry young and to a proper German. From his beliefs he created laws about marriage and families. ...read more.

Middle

The boys to grow up to be soldiers and the girls to be young mothers. This was Hitler's plan to make Germany a more powerful country. Hitler also made August 12th a day of awarding the motherhood cross. It was this day every year because this was his mother's birthday. The award was awarded to the women who had the most children. The gold was for 8 children, silver for 6 children and bronze for 4 children. Unmarried women who fell pregnant were not a social problem it was encouraged. There was also a place were unmarried women could go to get pregnant it was a selected building called a lebensborn. ...read more.

Conclusion

They were discouraged from dieting as it was not good for child birth, they were to have a well built figure. They were also not to smoke it was considered not German. There was also a common rhyme for women: "Take hold of, kettle, broom and pan, Then you'll surly get a man! Shop and office leave alone, your true life work Lies at home." Many women who lived in the traditional rural areas and small towns agreed with Hitler, many women felt that the proper role of a woman was to support their husband. There was also resentment towards working women in the early 1930's, since they were seen as keeping men out of jobs. It all created a lot of pressure on women to conform to what the Nazis called "the tradition balance" between men and women. ...read more.

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