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The Somme

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Introduction

The Somme For Haig's plan to be successful , he needed to pick up from where the British had failed. Seeing from the battle of Loos. Firstly, as the front was too narrow, he needed somewhere where the front would be wide. Allowing good access for the reserves to carry the momentum of a raid forward. Seeing as gas was one of the main subjects to the loss in loos, gas was seen as too unpredictable. It would not be a main factor in the battle of the somme. However, to replace gas bombs, would be gas shells, fired at smaller targets, which would then be raided by foot soldiers. Information is key to winning a battle. Haig sent aircrafts to scour the German trenches , searching for weaknesses and strengths. As seen from battles before hand, tasks too unrealistic were re-place by more realistic targets, such a taking a trench or a particular area targeted by mass amounts of soldiers. In case of a breakthrough in the enemy lines, the cavalry were ready to charge. They were given orders to destroy railway tracks and all sources of German links to the trenches. ...read more.

Middle

When one of their front lines were taken, the Germans would automatically strike back, gaining the front line once again, by taking fall advantage of their second line of trenches. This was the war of attrition. On 14 July a dawn attack resulted in the seizure of 6,000 yards (5486m) of the German line between Longueval and Bazentin-le-Petit. Longueval, which was largely captured on 14 July, was cleared by the end of the month, but the Germans in neighbouring villages on the front line with held a total English break through. From 23 July to 5 August, the Australian divisions were involved in a costly but successful struggle for Poziļæ½res village, taking Thiepval on the way. This meant German forces were gradually being forced back. September By the end of August , the German first and second lines had been taken. It was now a matter of piling on the pressure. But with German reinforcements constantly being pushed into the trenches, they had managed to form a resistance in the northern sector of the second line, around serre. By mid-September the British were ready to assault the German third line of defences with a new weapon, the tank. ...read more.

Conclusion

Is it was something to build upon. You cannot win a football match without a victory to build on. The Somme gave the British confidence. It was their first major win over the Germans. The idea of coming out of the darkness, and beating of the Germans is what helped the British win the war. It gave them momentum to carry on right to the end. However, some could say that it wasn't the victory in the Somme that was the turning point of the war. But the joining of the Americans. Yes! The Americans did influence the Germans, and helped the moral in the British camp. But I think it was the whole idea of the British being able to beat the Germans by themselves. Let's not forget the French! It might of even been the French attitude towards the war that was the turning point. Their knowledge of the land must of helped find the weaknesses in the German trenches. Concluding this, I feel it was the feeling of independency with the victory over the Germans that was the turning point of the war. It was self belief that didn't let the British and French hearts drop. Like how you feel after a long homework like this. It was a job well done. And a positive to build on......... ...read more.

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