• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The SS was the most powerful and most sinister element of the part movement. Originally formed as Hitler's elite body guard in 1925, it was turned into a formidable private party by its leader Herinrich Himmler.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

The SS was the most powerful and most sinister element of the part movement. Originally formed as Hitler's elite body guard in 1925, it was turned into a formidable private party by its leader Herinrich Himmler. The SS was modelled on the Jesuit Order of the Catholic Church. Its members were subjected to strict discipline. They were expected to show complete obedience to the Fuhrer. The SS were the radical elite of the Nazi Party. This is shown from the late 1930s when the SS had become a vast organisation, involved in most aspects of the Third Reich. The SS alongside the Gestapo, was the most powerful and feared in Nazi Germany. There are older and newer interpretations of the SS created by historians. Older interpretations, by historians such as Brancher, see Hitler exercising his authority through a clearly defined set of Government institutions. They regard Germany as a totalitarian state where the SS performed the essential function of terror. ...read more.

Middle

The Gestapo undertook the role of the secret police force. In April 1933, Goring incorporated the Prussian political police force into the Gestapo and set up their new offices on the Prince Alberstrasse in Berlin. In April 1934, Goring appointed Himmler head of the unified political force. This was important as it gave Himmler and the SS some control over the state police. In 1936 any confusion was resolved when Hitler appointed Himmler head of the German police. In 1939 the Reich Security Head Office (RSHA) was formed, which brought together the Gestapo and the SD under the central leadership of the SS. By 1939, in its role as the political police force, the Gestapo became the most important element in the state's security system. It played a key role eliminating opposition through creating an elaborate terror machine. Those suspected of opposition to the regime or those denounced (informed on) by their neighbours often ended up imprisoned in one of many concentration camps by the SS. ...read more.

Conclusion

to take suspects into 'protective custody' and, after the SA, the SS emerged as the chief police arm of the Nazi Party. Between 1933 and 1939 about 225,000 Germans were convicted and imprisoned without trial. It directed it energies against all enemies of Nazism, whether political or racial, later taking over responsibility for concentrating and extermination camps. However, because this was such a large organisation Himmler used a variety of methods to keep it untied. This included the intelligence department to spy on everyone in the organisation, constantly transferring people to other departments, controlled propaganda within the organisation as well as career prospects. Himmler did this so that positions could overlap and the he can be above them all and none could plot against him. This is shown in the steady change in the organisation structure of the SS. To conclude I would agree with the newer interpretations. This is because there was no clear-cut structure. Also the fact that in areas of high population in Germany there were a handful of SS soldiers. Anjna Galliara Analyse the power of the SS in the Nazi State ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. Biography on Heinrich Himmler

    Himmler now has control of all the political and criminal police forces throughout the Third Reich, allowing the SS to infiltrate the regular police. 1938 - Support for Hitler is further buoyed by his policy of foreign expansion. Austria is annexed on 13 March.

  2. To what extent was the SS a "state within a state"? How powerful was ...

    It can be shown that the SS had significant influence as one of these bodies. However, the SS' organisation was overshadowed by other parts of the state like the foreign office. Yet the SS soon developed its totalitarian and autocratic nature.

  1. Thr opposition of the Church.

    Among the various sects of Protestants (most of which had adopted liberal theology and had apostatized in the late 1800s), a new "German Church" was instituted: "Dr. Reinholdt Krause, the Berlin district leader of the sect, proposed the abandonment of the Old Testament, 'with its tales of cattle merchants and

  2. How and why do Historians approaches to the MunichAgreement differ from each other?

    They condemn the British policy towards the Sudentenland question and claim that the Britain abandoned their high moral standings. These high moral standings had earlier been an important part of their policy. They claim that the excuses used by Chamberlain not to help Czechoslovakia, as and ally and a member

  1. The SS (Schutzstaffel).

    This powerful organization had the ability to claim superiority over the German law structure, with the power to overrule the court system in Germany. In instances, German courts offered freedom to several individuals who were taken back into custody by the Gestapo due to suspicion, and reasons beyond explanation.

  2. Heinrich Himmler was Reichsfhrer-SS (Reich SS Leader) and Chief of the German police. In ...

    As the war went on, the armored portions of the SS - the Waffen SS - began to rival the Armed Forces for power in the military field, culminating in Himmler's being named Minister of the Interior in 1943 and chief of the Replacement Army in 1944.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work