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The struggle for the emancipation of women. - WHY did women get the vote and what is the most important reason they did?

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Introduction

Cherry Robinson 01/05/2007 Coursework: The struggle for the emancipation of women. WHY did women get the vote and what is the most important reason they did? They eventually got the vote in 1918 after the war ended on November 11th at 11 am. In 1918 a new law was passed to re-organise the electoral register it was called the 'Representation of the peoples act'. Added onto that law was a clause saying that women over 30 could vote but there were conditions, they would have to have rented a house for 12 months or have owned a house. Finally in 1928 voting became completely equal. I agree that women's efforts in the war helped them gain the right to vote. One of the reasons was that they helped out by making munitions (shells). They were made all over Britain in places such as Woolwich, Leeds and Birmingham. This was the first job women had during the war and the most important. Over 1 million women worked in munitions!! The reason they were allowed to start working in munitions factories was because the British army were severely low on shells after 1915. They were down to firing a few shells a day while we were bombarded with shells non-stop. The reason the shortage developed was because the government let too many of the munitions workers go and fight so there was a shortage of workers. When the shortage occurred the women again started asking for their right to serve but it was denied again. So they made a very famous march to Whitehall where they demanded the right to serve their country. Adding to that Mrs Pankhurst asked for women's wage conditions to become fairer. The P.M. at the time David Lloyd George obliged and allowed them to start working and have equal wages. Women did not only make shells they did lots of other significant work to make up for all the men that left to fight. ...read more.

Middle

Emmeline Pankhurst formed them in 1903 and their protests got worse and more extreme as the years passed. From starting off by letter writing then going through all extremes to end up doing stuff like damaging public property, hunger strikes and even jumping under horses at the derby in 1913. But just by reading those brief comments you can see how much they wanted the vote and how far they had to go to get it. Another big factor, which is often overlooked, is the part the N.U.W.S.S. played in getting women the vote. A lot of people even go as far as saying that the N.U.W.S.S. were more important and instrumental in getting the vote for women. They were a lot bigger than the W.S.P.U. because they had members all over the country whereas the main percentages of the W.S.P.U. were from London. The N.U.W.S.S. were a lot different from the W.S.P.U. they believed in peaceful protesting unlike the suffragettes. They were nicknamed the Suffragists to go along with the suffragettes. There wasn't too much in common with these two different groups apart from the leader of the suffragettes used to be in the suffragists. They made a VERY big contribution, which a lot of people do not know. The contribution I'm talking about is when the suffragettes went completely out of control the people that once supported women's franchise were turning against it. At one time in 1900 more than half of all MP's were for votes for women. Mrs Fawcett described the movement as 'glacier-like, slow but very powerful'. But after 1903 many people thought that the suffragettes had gone too far because of the extremes their campaigns had reached, people were tired about hearing what they had done next. But Millicent Fawcett and the suffragists worked tirelessly on what seemed to be a lost cause, gaining back the support of public. ...read more.

Conclusion

She also was the first female mayor in England, which was also a major thing because that proved that men were starting to trust women's judgement. Therefore I conclude that neither side I argued for has a stronger case than the other. So before the war they were making progress and they might've got the vote but without their efforts in the war it may have taken them a longer time to prove just how important they were. In my opinion in the end justice prevailed and women were allowed to vote and gained their freedom . A portrait of Elizabeth Garret Anderson. I have decided to give you information about an individual that has had an impact on the Right for Women to Vote. Emily Davidson a member of the Suffragettes had made plans to go to the 1913 Derby to embark on a political course to draw attention to the women's movement. Her intentions to her members were unclear. When she arrived at the track she positioned herself inside the rails at Tattenham corner. Fifteen horses ran for a first prize of �6450, Craganour was the favourite. Shogun was second favourite, rank outsider at 50-1 was Anmer one of King George V's horses, rode by Herbert Jones. As the 1913 Derby began Emily Davidson waited until the kings horse was in sight and as it approached the corner Emily stepped out in front of Anmer and attempted to snatch the rains of the Kings horse. It is claimed that Emily held on for a few seconds, but the horse moving at over 30 m.p.h and weighing over three-quarters of a ton knocked her over. The horse stumbled throwing Jones violently to the ground, he and Emily both bleeding badly. Spectators rushed onto the track as the race continued. Both were taken to hospital, injuries sustained to Jones proved to be not serious. Unfortunately for Emily Davidson she never regained consciousness and died four days later. She was buried in Northumberland, the inscription on her grave stone read "Deeds, not words". Five years after her death women won the right to vote. ...read more.

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