• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"The suffragette campaign made it less likely that women would be given the vote." Do you agree with this statement? Use the sources pg58-68 and your own knowledge.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

"The suffragette campaign made it less likely that women would be given the vote." Do you agree with this statement? Use the sources pg58-68 and your own knowledge. I think that the suffragette campaign made it more likely that women would be given the vote at the beginning of the campaign, but they went too far and made it slightly less likely by the end of the campaign, as I will explain in the following. Before the suffragette campaign was the suffragist campaign, these were peaceful protesters that staged meetings and mass rallies. However the men in the country were not taking much notice of the peaceful protesters, so the suffragettes decided to take what would have been seen as a far more radical approach to get the votes for women. ...read more.

Middle

So the government decided to force feed the suffragettes that refused to eat, this also gained a lot of support for the suffragettes and against the government because the force feeding was a breach of their human rights. The suffragettes gained a lot of support for their cause by their radical methods; this was because people had to take notice of the brick throwing because women had never had this kind of attitude towards something on such a large scale before. The suffragettes made it more likely that women would get the vote because the government had to realise that these women weren't going to sit back and not have the vote. This was shown in 1911 when the government promised a Conciliation Bill, and this bill gained all party support, it go the biggest majority ever. ...read more.

Conclusion

However the suffragists were saying that the suffragettes were the worst enemy of the women's suffrage cause, they thought that the suffragettes were showing themselves to be thugs, throwing bricks through windows. Many people agreed with this, they thought that the radical actions of the suffragette made the government more determined that women didn't deserve the vote. I feel that the suffragettes made it more likely that women would gain the vote at the start of their campaign but they needed to know when to stop, they took it too far and made a lot of people feel that they had damaged the suffragette cause, but they were still more likely to get the vote than before the suffragette campaign began. I think that they both helped and damaged the cause, but they helped it more than they damaged it. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Britain 1905-1951 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Britain 1905-1951 essays

  1. Why did women fail to gain the vote between 1900-1914?

    money, and as for him she was nothing more than a fashion item. They would have servants to do all their housework and a governess would look after the female children. The male children would go to school so they could go out into the world with their skills to get a highly paid job.

  2. Women's Campaign for the Right to Vote

    However, there was still much opposition to women receiving the vote. Another reason why women achieved the vote was that there was now better employment now available to them. Employment ========== Women who before could only work in factories now became nurses and teachers.

  1. Women and the Vote

    People living at the time might not have appreciated this book because Emmeline Pankhurst wrote it, hence they would not have read it. This book also might have a lack of objectivity because it was written at a time of sorrow for Emmeline Pankhurst - she was in prison.

  2. 'The Passchendaele campaign was a failure.' How far do you agree with this statement?

    offensive began in 1918 it was no longer possible to continue to hold the ridges. There was a strategic withdrawal. Passchendaele was given up. The salient was reduced to a tight little circle that consisted of Ypres and its outskirts.

  1. 'The British offensive on the Sommewas doomed to be a disaster from the start ...

    accordingly, digging deep trenches up to 12 metres deep, and had made pulley systems so that their machine guns could be lowered and taken out of the dug outs quickly. As for the barbed wire, it had merely been mangled, and had not been destroyed so even as the soldiers

  2. Did votes for women become more or less likely between 1906-1914?

    The reason the NUWSS thought this was that the WSPU carried out many violent attacks such as burning churches, bombing trains and attacking individuals. One of the first types of violence the WSPU used was window smashing.

  1. To what extent did the work done by women during World War 1 gain ...

    These achievements brought about by non-militant feminists over fifty years must be seen as vitally important milestones on the road to enfranchisement 6 It must be conceded, however, that these rights had far more significance in the lives of middle class women.

  2. Dunkirk was a triumph? How far do you agree with this statement?

    It also says that they are itching to go back and fight. This source backs up the previous source when it talks about the bravery of the soldiers. This all may not be entirely true. These stories could be a way to keep the morale up of the British people

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work