• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

The Suffragettes and the Struggle for Womens Right to Vote (Q. 3)

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

3. Study sources D and E and use your own knowledge. Why despite the suffragette activity, had women not gained the vote by the outbreak of the First World War? Sources D and E contradict one another in terms of opinion, but support each other when it comes to stating that no matter how much support the Suffragettes got from the public, women would still not be given the vote. Source D, which is an extract from a book written in 1912 by leading Suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst, argues that the Suffragettes' violent campaigning and methods got the Suffragettes a lot of publicity in the media and newspapers. She also states that even if the Suffragettes had the public's support, the government still refused to give women the vote, prompting the Suffragettes to fight further for their 'cause' and continue their violent methods of campaigning. ...read more.

Middle

The statement that the Member of Parliament makes about reasons for voting against votes for women gives only one reason for why the government was against the principle of giving women the vote. As well as the increased violence and women's suffrage not being a major issue, the government felt that the WSPU especially did not have a clear policy of what they wanted to achieve in terms of law. The members of government who did want to support votes for women did not want to vote against their own parties. The Liberals had also lost several seats and were more concerned with other, not to mention their own party's political issues. By the time that war broke out, people's attention was now completely diverted from women's votes. Following the WSPU's split, all of the suffragettes took different paths. Emmeline Pankhurst showed her support for the country being at war by calling off a major campaign to break into Buckingham Palace. ...read more.

Conclusion

In conclusion, suffragette activity seemed to create more opposition and make more people reluctant to support the Suffragettes and votes for women than before suffragette campaigning. The suffragettes gained many more enemies through their violent campaigning methods, and although that they claimed it brought them all the more publicity, this publicity seemed to be more negative than positive. When women were given the vote in 1918, it seemed that it had more to do with the realization of the importance of women in the war effort than the campaigning of the Suffragettes, and if the government's decision to give women the vote in 1918 was influenced by the Suffragettes, it seemed that it was not because the government finally completely agreed with the points that the Suffragettes had made, but it was more out of fear of the violent campaigning resurfacing once more. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Britain 1905-1951 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Britain 1905-1951 essays

  1. The Suffragettes.

    But the Suffragettes refused to bow to violence. This was because in 1913 the government withdrew a bill to alter the voting system. The suffragettes felt betrayed and began to use more violent methods. They burned down churches as the Church of England was against what they wanted; they vandalised

  2. Why did women fail to gain the vote between 1900-1914?

    To prevent the women dying from starvation in the police cells the government brought out the 'Cat and Mouse Act', this meant as soon as the women got ill they would be released to recover then immediately arrested again, this would often go on for the whole sentence.

  1. The struggle for the emancipation of women.

    The Elementary schools may of given opportunities to the lower classes but these were largely overcrowded and they had to leave at the age of 9, which doesn't help them much as at this age they were still too young for jobs.

  2. The Struggle For The Emancipation Of Women

    The reasons for it not to be counted as progress is the fact that why go through all that bother when you're not going to get a job because of sexism, women would get paid less then men and child birth was a reason why women weren't hired because if

  1. The struggle for the emancipation of women. - WHY did women get the vote ...

    for women to start working and also how much young women were eager to help the war effort. Also during the war lots of military jobs opened up for women, from 1917 women were allowed to join the Women's Auxiliary Army Corps the W.A.A.C.

  2. Campaing for WOmens Rights

    Married middle-class women found it hard to work since all of their income would be received by their husbands anyway. Many jobs were also excluded from women since they seen as incompetent and indecisive by men. Elizabeth Garrett Anderson and Sophia Jex-Blake were both two women who ventured into the world of professional jobs.

  1. Suffragettes: Women's Failure in Receiving the Vote

    The women who wanted the vote were united in their aim but divided in approach. The main women's society groups had very different methods of getting what they wanted. Most people thought that if the women couldn't agree then perhaps they didn't deserve the vote.

  2. How Important a part did Women's War Work Play in the Decision to Grant ...

    This making a small amount of men for keep up the efficiency of Britain's economy; women started working in munitions factories, office administrations, shop keeping etc, as more job open more women became employed to work in any situation. Leading to the end of the war, when the majority of

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work