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The treaty of Versailles was signed between Britain, France and USA. Lloyd-George, Clemencau and Wilson all devised a treaty that could cripple Germany, leading to their aim - prevention of further conflict and a war.

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Introduction

Following the end of the First World War in 1919, it was decided that, prevention of another war was an important factor in Europe. The treaty of Versailles was signed between Britain, France and USA. Lloyd-George, Clemencau and Wilson all devised a treaty that could cripple Germany, leading to their aim - prevention of further conflict and a war. The treaty was to be divided; territorially, military, financially and general. Much of Germany was taken from them, to try and reduce ambition. Major reductments in Military were introduced Germany's army was reduced to 100,000 men; the army was not allowed tanks nor an airforce, only 6 capital naval ships were allowed and no submarines. Finally and perhaps most damaging to Germany, a huge some of reparation money was demanded as compensation. $6,600Billion was to be paid in instalments. Being placed with the guilt for the war created a hostile relationship, and caused a lot of resentment. However much historical debate has centred around the Treaty and its influence over starting the Second World War. Revisionist Carr believed that the Treaty was a 'failure to solve 'German Problem''1. Revisionist AJP Taylor supported this as he believed the second World War was 'a war over the settlement of Versailles; a war that had been implicit when the first World War ended because the peacemakers had not solved the German problem.'2 Some revisionists believe in more sympathetic beliefs, to Henig Versailles ...read more.

Middle

The school of thought to challenge this are the Revisionists, AJP Taylor believed that Hitler was a master of opportunism, and didn't follow a plan. The arguments of the 'Guilty Men' highlight the obvious flaws in British foreign policy, and the negligence of action towards Hitler, of how damaging these became over time. The policy of appeasement, before 1936, was very much aligned to the dictation of Adolph Hitler. Where Chamberlain didn't want to upset him, or appear to be setting against him. To do this would disrupt the political status in Europe, and Neville Chamberlain believed that this would cause war. Appeasement could avoid this, however, as I will now examine, had war become inevitable by 1936 due to Britain's failure to act on the Naval agreement of 1935 and at the Rhineland in 1936? Had the policy of appeasement encouraged the opportunistic Hitler and simply aided a leader with a masterplan? Chapter two. British reaction to Hitler's actions reflected the problems they had as a nation in the twenties and thirties. British foreign policy was now openly Appeasement. Neville Chamberlain, a previous Chancellor of the Exchequer, had a specific direction for Britain, economical strength and independence. He understood that Britain was not ready for another war. The debate on the economics of the war remains in high contention. Richard Overy states 'Economics were not in that bad of state that (Britain) need not to go to war.'1. ...read more.

Conclusion

It was not until 4 years after the first appeasing event, the Anglo-German Naval pact that Chamberlain decided to change his stance. The opportunities to stop Hitler came on several occasions. The most prominent of these came in 1936 when he entered the Rhineland. A strong form of resistance would have stopped Germany, and would have stopped the growing ambition and desire of Hitler and his public. As a result of this Hitler was able to continue his European domination. Hitlocentric Gerhard Weinberg believed that ' the only realistic accommodation Chamberlain could have reached...(was to) abandon its old age commitment to uphold the balance of power in Europe'9, This therefore allowing Hitler to dominate parts of Eastern Europe. Word Count: 2,263 1 Boxer sheet White ask Miss H 2 Same again! Probs origins of second world war. 3 Again the sheet 4 Have a guess which sheet 5 Jay M. Winter, Cambridge University on Hitler on the Versailles Treaty 6 Nope it's a new one....Hitler, 1889-1936: Hubris 7 The Gathering Storm Churchill 1948 8 Bell, 1986 p211 from the Robbins - appeasement 9 McDonough Sheet chap 5 Hilgruber. 1 Boxer sheet I think Overy 2 Contempary Britain, 1914-1979 3 Parker - Timeline thing on public support. 4 AJP Taylor - Origins of the Second World War 5 Contemporary Britain, 1914-1979 Robert Pearce 6 Robbins timeliney thing 7 Mommsen Mc D Chap 5 8 Yellow sheet Boxer 9 Frank Mcdonough, Hitler, Chamberlain and appeasement pg 77 ...read more.

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