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There are two main groups of people in Northern Ireland, both who have different beliefs, they are the republicans/nationalists and the loyalists/unionists.

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Introduction

1. There are two main groups of people in Northern Ireland, both who have different beliefs, they are the republicans/nationalists and the loyalists/unionists. The republicans/nationalists are mostly Catholics, they want Ireland to be united and they want to be independent from the United Kingdom. The loyalists/unionists are mostly Protestants, they want to remain loyal to the crown and they want to stay part of the United Kingdom, they believe in 'status Quo which means they want things to stay the same, they don't want anything to change. The republicans/nationalists and the loyalists/unionists are very different because they both have different ideas about how they want Ireland to be run. One thing, which is similar about both groups, is the fact that there are terrorists and extremists. The IRA tried to get their way with 'terror'. But some members of the IRA thought that the IRA was selling out to the British and Irish government. The IRA was then split into two splinter groups called the real IRA and the continuity IRA. ...read more.

Middle

The Protestant leader, Ian Paisley was quick to express his concern. This led to elements of the Protestants becoming extreme in their response to marches. The distrust led to violence and increased hatreds. The Protestant violence and the fact that the police were ineffective led to the IRA claming that they were the only force able to protect the Catholic population. The government misinterpretations of the events further complicated the matters. They sent the army to Northern Ireland, which resulted in further catholic hatred and hostility, there was a curfew in the Falls road and confinement was used this confirmed to people that the army was a unionist force (protestants). The Protestants wanted them there, as they thought they were there to protect them against the Catholics, and the Catholics didn't want them there. The IRA saw this as a 'problem' and used force to evict the British from Northern Ireland. This led to more Protestants taking part in terrorist activities. By now both sides felt the needed to protect themselves. ...read more.

Conclusion

The parliament had far more power than previous Northern Ireland assemblies and could legislate (make laws) for the province on the economy, agriculture, education, and the environment. At the moment the assembly is currently suspended, as the different parties couldn't agree on the issue of decommissioning weapons. Some of the breakthroughs, which have been made, are; In the last five years violence has virtually stopped, the real IRA and the continuity IRA, have decided on a ceasefire, most terrorists are handing in their weapons, de-commissioning. They have recreated Irelands own parliament called Stormont, at the moment Stormont is suspended, as they cannot agree within the parliament. The problems, which still exist, is in the schools and homes. The problems include, religion, politics, the fact that there's a lot of history behind everything. Such as the orange marches. The orange marches are a remembrance of the 1690 defeat of Catholic King James by Protestant Prince William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne. The members of the Protestant Orange order parade to province-wide rallies. Below is a picture of one of these marches. A solution for the school problems is to have mixed schools, no segregated schools. ...read more.

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