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These two sources are not bout Haig and the battle of the Somme. How far do you agree that they have no use for the historian studying Haig and the Battle of the Somme?

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Introduction

Study sources D and E. These two sources are not bout Haig and the battle of the Somme. How far do you agree that they have no use for the historian studying Haig and the Battle of the Somme? In source, D there is a still from the TV series 'Blackadder goes forth'. This program was written for TV to entertain people while still getting across about the trench warfare ( new kind of fighting) and historical facts even though it was not written in 1916. Blackadder comes across as someone who is professional, realistic and knows what will happen from passed knowledge. ...read more.

Middle

Yes." This highlights the fact that Haig did not change his ?strategy because they are talking before a battle and know that many will die. "His drinks cabinet six inches closer to Berlin" shows war was pointless and in a way making fun of Haig. Source E on the other hand is a cartoon of a parade ground from a British magazine, which was published in February 1917(more recent source than D). This source would have still been written in the war time (finished in 1918 on the 11th of November at 11.00) . Source E is quite relevant because it was written at the time ?and sums up the views of the ordinary people. ...read more.

Conclusion

Both sources D and E were written as comedy, to be funny and are not directly about Haig and the Somme. I do not think though that this makes the sources invalid when studying Haig and the Somme as it gives a view of real people and the 620,000 casualties from the Somme battle (and also the million British that died in the total of WW1). Satire is a useful way to gauge ?public feeling, I am sure that in the future people will use tapes of ?programs such as "Have I Got News for You" to find out what the ?people's views are now, so I think that both these sources are useful. The sources are fairly reliable as they were both published by historians even though it may be biased towards one side. ...read more.

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