• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To some people the 1960s were the best of times; to others it was a period when things went wrong. Why do people have such different ideas about the 60s?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

To some people the 1960s were the best of times; to others it was a period when things went wrong. Why do people have such different ideas about the '60s? Many people who lived through the 60s decade feel it was revolutionary; a 'swinging' period after years of austerity and gloom with the young people commanding the army of change. However, as in every debate, there are two opposing opinions. To some people, the 1960s was a time when the post-war stress was finally over, a time when Britain became 'Cool Britannia' because of its fashion, music and art scenes. The 1960s was a decade which people still regard as the 'swinging sixties,' when people were out to have fun. It was also a period of more freedom and opportunities for many people and prosperity. This has highlighted by Harold Macmillan, who exclaimed, "you've never had it so good." ...read more.

Middle

However, many people that were pro-establishment saw these groups as dangerous to the traditional values of authority and order. Whilst there were big achievements nationally and internationally such as England winning the world cup and the first man to travel to space, as well as the moon, there were also damaging political events. The building of the Berlin wall officially began a cold war between superpowers, which left the world with anticipation of not knowing what was going to happen. The Cuban Missile Crisis threatened nuclear war. In America, there was the assassination of President Kennedy and the Vietnam War. Both were destructive and sad events. Locally in England, there was the profumo affair where a British politician had an affair with a Russian who was considered an enemy because of the cold war. This struck chaos into political values in England. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, this greater power given to women seemed to lower marriages and general partnerships. The number of illegitimate births rose from 5.8% in 1960 to 8.2% in 1970 and the number of marriages ending in divorce rose from one in fifteen to one in ten. However, these two statistics had begun rising from 1945 and there was no significant increase in them throughout the 1960s. The fact is that men and women were gaining more independence and deciding to use it in different ways. One key question is 'Would the changes that took place during and since the sixties have taken place anyway? The answer is almost certainly yes. With more mature, better educated and higher earning young people it is inevitable that these changes in society would have taken place anyway. However, there is a question that will always be contested and argued about, 'were the 1960s the best of times, or was it a period where many things went wrong in society?' There are strong views each way but there is no clear answer. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE History Projects section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE History Projects essays

  1. Appeasement:Right or Wrong?

    In March 1938, Anschluss (Union) with Austria, again forbidden by the Treaty of Versailles, takes place. Then in August 1938, Germany started to collect their forces near the Czech border. People began to think that there might really be a war.

  2. Live Simply That Others May Simply Live

    and Smuts got his wish Gandhi never did set foot in South Africa again. Gandhi was now 45 and a celebrity known through India for sataygraha's success and entered a world about to change with the onset of World War 1.

  1. To Some People, The 1960s Were The Best Of Times, To Others It Was ...

    Traditionalists also believed that people with lower class should be segregated from people with higher class. Prime Minister Harold Wilson that was elected in 1964 was from a working class, he wanted society to become more meritocratic so people would do well because of their ability not because of their social status and how much money they had.

  2. To some people the 1960s were the best of times, to others it was ...

    Intertwined with the theme of new styles and clothing, music became more and more popular and changed almost as much as clothing designs. The fashions people dressed in were heavily influenced by different types of artist and bands. The groups often expressed their feelings openly, this also meant that British

  1. Analyse various representations of Arthur, from the earliest times to recent scholarship.

    Green, reactive to Geoffrey's purpose has recently written 'Indeed the whole portrayal of Arthur in the Historia Regum Britanniae might be seen to reflect the needs and aims of the 12 Century Author... there is nothing at all suggestive of such a notion of Arthur as this Gallic adventurer''28.

  2. Describe popular culture in Britain at the beginning of 1960s

    However this change in music did not happen suddenly, it gradually grew upon the British society. An example of this would be the introduction of Elvis to Britain. When Elvis was first publicly aired on the television from the United States, the government would only allow his upper body to

  1. GCSE History Coursework: How were the various groups of people affected by events during ...

    Source 4 also gives insight into the extent to which the sinking affected the Argentine's, especially the captain, Hector Ponzo, as he describes the 'agonizing decision to abandon ship.' The Argentine Public would also have been feeling intense fury towards Britain as they disregarded the rules of engagement with regard to the 200 mile exclusion zone.

  2. Peoples different opinions on the 1960s

    For young people there was a growing feeling of optimism; that anything was possible, they had new music and fashions as well as cars, which were now accessible. The growing popularity of television helped spread popular culture around the globe, so trends could take off rapidly.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work