• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent did medicine and public health change between the Roman withdrawal from Britain and 1350?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

´╗┐To what extent did medicine and public health change between the Roman withdrawal from Britain and 1350? The Romans occupied Britain in AD43, and brought with them good systems of public health and logical solutions to medicine and treatment given to them by Hippocrates in around 300AD. This was then enhanced by Galen a little after the occupation, and this left Britain well managed in terms of public health and medicine. I believe that the high standard of public health severely deteriorated and the standard of medicine stagnated or possible got a little worse. Primarily, the public health system became undeniably worse. The water supply from aqueducts was almost completely cut off without the workforce of slaves and the skilled engineers. ...read more.

Middle

Some attempts were even made by the government to improve cleanliness, but the Anglo-Saxon wars were rampant at this time meaning kings were preoccupied, and unable to make any country wide decisions since the government was never unitary. Also, the latent laissez-faire attitude at the time prevented the government caring too much. With regards to public health, there was very little continuity between the Roman withdrawal and 1350 because everything was left in near anarchy so few changes could be made. However, I would argue that medicine only really stagnated. Because Galen backed the Roman Catholic Church in his theories when he said that the body showed intelligent design, any dissent from the techniques resulted in either being ignored or actively stopped. ...read more.

Conclusion

Of course, the Christian Church now played a stronger role and had displaced belief in Salus and Asclepius meaning people instead prayed to God and the Saints such as to St Blaise for a sore throat. But, many of the books written by Galen and Hippocrates were burned in the anarchy caused by the withdrawal so some knowledge was lost, causing a possible slight decline in medical knowledge. Between the Roman withdrawal and 1350, medicine only changed a little and got slightly worse. To conclude, public health got a lot worse when the Romans withdrew taking with them a unitary government, a strong workforce of slaves and the army. However, while medicine did get a little worse with the loss of books it mostly remained the same with similar beliefs about cause and treatment of disease. (23 minutes) ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE History Projects section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE History Projects essays

  1. Improvements in Public Health

    full of people, filth and germs round every corner and the fact that the homeless children and even some adults, as seen in the cartoon bellow, where rolling around in the waste on the streets. The picture is a cartoon drawn at a time when the government believed that looking

  2. Research Topic: Health Welfare of elderly in Shanghai

    from 1950 to early 1980s are now entering the age of retirement, causing a huge demand for elderly-focused health care, pensions and welfare. Health welfare and services is especially essential for elderly who do not have families that take care of them.

  1. Development of Medicine

    French chemist Louis Pasteur and German physician Robert Koch separately established this theory which led to many medical breakthroughs. The American physician and author Oliver Wendell Holmes and of the Hungarian obstetrician Ignaz Philipp Semmelweis showed that the high rate of mortality in women afer childbirth was attributable to infectious agents transmitted by unwashed hands.

  2. Public health in Britain during the hundred years from 1850 to 1950

    observations, it was found that there was a link between cholera and water supply. From a source written by Mr. Perkins to the government board of health in 1848, he says how cholera affected the poorer classes who used the infected water most of the time.

  1. The seige of 1216 brought around real little change

    that the north gate was a weak point and so they decided to block up the North gate, and replace it with three D-shaped towers, which would make the defence at ths point much stronger, due to the shape, which deflect projectiles.

  2. What Impact did the fall of The Roman Empire Have On Medicine And Public ...

    The Roman houses also had heated floors. This meant during the winter the Romans wee kept warm. The Romans also had a balanced diet. Galen believed the theory of the four humours but he had different ideas to Hippocrates. Galen believed in opposites, that if you were a weak person then you should do exercise.

  1. To what extent wasBritain Romanised

    New species of animals also came to Britain, especially cattle, and pigs. The Edict of Prices by Diocletian refers to the birrus Britannicus, a cloak made from goat's hair, and the tapete Britannicum - a woollen blanket. As these products are referred to as Britannicus (British), this source indicates that

  2. History of Medicine Revision Notes.

    He drew on the work of Hippocrates and other previous doctors 1. He wrote many books, which survived with a list of different cures (he gave opposites as cures to restore the balance of humours). They survived because he talked about God as the ?Creator? ? it fitted in with

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work