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To what extent did the New Deal alleviate the United States' economic crisis?

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Introduction

A - Plan of the Investigation Question: To what extent did the New Deal alleviate the United States' economic crisis? Ever since the details of the Great Depression began to emerge from the post-World War I rubble; historians have wondered how such a horrific catastrophe could have taken place. The following investigation will examine the role of the New Deal in improving the U.S. economic crisis from two differing perspectives: the New Deal, when viewed as a whole, was an economical achievement of epic proportions, and that none of the successes associated with the economic crises during the Great Depression era can be attributed to the New Deal. The frame of the investigation will seek to explain and evaluate both view points through Carl N. Degler's The New Deal and Frank Freidel's The New Deal and the American People. The investigation will synthesize particular aspects from both books, such as the war upon unemployment, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and the National Recovery Administration, to reach a conclusion regarding the extent to which the New Deal improved the economic crisis of America. B - Summary of Evidence Unable to find a clear underlying or cohesive philosophy for the New Deal, historians have fallen back upon calling it pragmatic, eclectic, or improvising. Concretely what these terms signify is that the New Deal tried a variety of approaches in trying to meet what it considered an economic problem. ...read more.

Middle

Degler's The New Deal is also a collage of viewpoints during the Great Depression. In spite of the vastness of opinions in this source, Degler still exhibits a bias in his liberal ideology. He strongly believes that Roosevelt tried several new ideas, which he claims to be liberal at the time, that allowed the government to actively participate in unionizing workers. A wider range of sources were available to Degler, as his work was published in 1970, as compared to Freidel. This source, published in Chicago, assesses the New Deal from differing perspectives, just as in The New Deal and the American People. The historical context, or value, of this source has evolved from that of Freidel's writing and this fact is evident by examining both sources. New arguments and reasoning appear in Degler's text that was never mentioned in Freidel's. This ultimately accounts for the purpose of Degler's The New Deal, to revise the effects of the New Deal from a 1970 perspective. D - Analysis The controversy surrounding the New Deal and America's economic crisis represents one of history's most challenging puzzles. According to Freidel, not all aspects of the New Deal were successful in lessening the extent of the economic crisis. In his The New Deal and the American People, the N.R.A. and the T.V.A. are regarded as successes; however, he sees the unemployment issue as a failure. Not only did the N.R.A. ...read more.

Conclusion

188. 4 Frank Freidel. The New Deal and the American People. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice- Hall Inc., 1964. 67. 5 Frank Freidel. The New Deal and the American People. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice- Hall Inc., 1964. 75. 6 Carl N. Degler. The New Deal. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1970. 105-107. 7 Carl N. Degler. The New Deal. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1970. 106. 8 Frank Freidel. The New Deal and the American People. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice- Hall Inc., 1964. 77. 9 Carl N. Degler. The New Deal. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1970. 62. 10 Frank Freidel. The New Deal and the American People. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice- Hall Inc., 1964. 38. 11 Frank Freidel. The New Deal and the American People. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice- Hall Inc., 1964. 36. 12 Frank Freidel. The New Deal and the American People. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice- Hall Inc., 1964. 72. 13 Frank Freidel. The New Deal and the American People. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice- Hall Inc., 1964. 77. 14 Frank Freidel. The New Deal and the American People. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice- Hall Inc., 1964. 113. 15 Carl N. Degler. The New Deal. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1970. 86. 16 Carl N. Degler. The New Deal. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1970. 18. 17 Carl N. Degler. The New Deal. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1970. 14. 18 Carl N. Degler. The New Deal. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1970. 125. 19 William Dudley. The Great Depression: Opposing Viewpoints. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 1994. 276-28. 1 ...read more.

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