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To what extent did the Weimar Republic overcome its problems by the end of 1923?

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Introduction

To what extent did the Weimar Republic overcome its problems by the end of 1923? Between 1919 and 1923, the Weimar Republic of Germany was besot with more than its fair share of problems. In particular, the Weimar Republic had six main problems: Treaty of Versailles, Left wing opposition -Sparticists, Right wing opposition - Kapp Putsch, Munich Putsch, Freikorps and Political murders, Ruhr by French and Hyperinflation. This was known as the crisis of 1919 - 1923. The three main causes of the crisis were: The treatment of Germany by the allies, Economic difficulties, and Political difficulties. The Weimar Republic were able to solve some of these problems, however, a significant number of problems remained unsolved. By the end of 1923, the Weimar Republic were able to partly solve some of its problems. The Treaty of Versailles was a problem in Germany that remained partly unsolved. ...read more.

Middle

However the communists were still active. Opposition from the right of the Kapp Putsch and Munich Putsch remained a partly unsolved problem for the Weimar Republic. Hitler failed in his attempts to capture Munich and march to Berlin. However, the Nazi party did not disappear, and Hitler became chancellor of Germany in January 1933. The Kapp Putsch was still a real threat, but after they had taken over Berlin the workers went on general strike and the attempted takeover failed. This was a sign of support. Afterwards the Weimar government returned to power. However, the right wing opposition were still around in Germany, therefore this remained partly unsolved. The general strike was so successful that the Kapp Putsch collapsed within days as public services ground to a halt. However, those who had participated in the putsch were never punished for their actions. ...read more.

Conclusion

However, in October 1923 the government stopped printing the old, worthless money and introduced a new temporary currency, the Rentenmark. By strictly limiting the amount of this currency in circulation the value of German money was stabilise, and in the next year a new permanent currency, the Reichsmark, was brought in. The Weimar Republic were able to solve or partly solve many of its problems by the end of 1923, however a significant number still remained unsolved. Opposition of the extreme right wing remained a big problem. Freikorps were left to cause trouble later on, and also the Nazi's were not all fully crushed after the Munich Putsch. They simply regrouped to fight again. Also the Treaty of Versailles was still in place and the Weimar were still constantly blamed. Germany's economy's weakness was not totally solved either, and the economy was just about sustained by US loans through the 1920s. ...read more.

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