• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent do the sources support the view that the prime motives for the Soviet modernisation programme under Stalin (1927 - 41) were the same as those of the Tsarist regime (1890 - 1900)?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Unit 3 Coursework Assignment Part A Task - To what extent do the sources support the view that the prime motives for the Soviet modernisation programme under Stalin (1927 - 41) were the same as those of the Tsarist regime (1890 - 1900)? These sources seem to agree that the prime motives for the Soviet modernisation programme under Stalin were the same as those of Witte and the Tsarist regime; however this is only up to a certain extent. The sources agree that the causes of the modernisation of Russia were based on the country's economic goals. "The economic relations of Russia to western Europe are fully comparable to the relations of colonial countries with their mother countries" This extract from a letter to the Tsar from Witte (source one) ...read more.

Middle

"Without her own industry (Russia) cannot achieve genuine economic independence" The source continues to say that this was a desirable quality for the country to possess because "only countries, which enjoy economic independence, have also the capacity to fully unfold their political might" Therefore this implies that the modernisation programme was based on political ideology and according to source five concentrated on "the building of socialism" in Russia. The speech also indicates that there's a political agenda within the party; where a change in personnel is necessary through modernisation "It will merely rid the Party of people who are getting in its way". The more recent source three appears to raise another motive for Witte's plans. In referring to the military value of the Trans Siberian railroad "Witte's railway boom of the 1890's had an obvious strategic dimension in the Trans Siberian project that gave Russia much enhanced diplomatic and military leverage in the Far East" therefore Russia was given a political and military advantage by this move. ...read more.

Conclusion

This relates the country's economic weaknesses to its military needs. To conclude, these sources do agree that the aims of the Soviet modernisation programme under Stalin and the programme run during the Tsarist regime were similar. These aims were basically to achieve economic, political and military goals. All of these motives were interlinked with one another and therefore reliant upon one another. However there are some differences; which are to be expected as the two policies were introduced in different periods and by different individuals. But there were other reasons as to why the programme was established under Stalin, these were based around gaining power for himself and ridding the party of certain members, who he perceived as a threat. Therefore the aim of Stalin's policies was much more political, whereas Witte's had more of an unintentional political impact. Therefore the motives weren't entirely the same in both periods and the extent of the sources support is limited. Word count: 685 ?? ?? ?? ?? Sarah Farncombe ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Russia, USSR 1905-1941 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Russia, USSR 1905-1941 essays

  1. Why did the Tsarist regime fall in 1917?

    Imagine if the cartoonist who drew source G had had access to source H - they would know that the Tsar was not actually under the influence of Rasputin - as source G would suggest. Source H is a historical account of Rasputin's influence, written after the period it depicts,

  2. Purges and Hysteria in the Soviet Union

    In Norway, Communists demonstrated against Trotsky. In the United States, the Left was stunned. Most of those associated with the Socialist Party denounced the trial, while many if not most Communists believed that bourgeois newspapers and radio stations were distorting the news.

  1. These three sources do not all give the same impression of Stalin. Source A ...

    He's saying how it is disgraceful that men care more for animals than their fellow man, when Stalin was the one who killed tens of millions of people! He is simply trying to make himself look like a caring, kind, moral man by putting everyone else down and portraying man kind to be blood thirsty.

  2. 'The Five Year Plans brought glory to Stalin and misery to his people' - ...

    strong opposition from the wealthy five million peasants known as the kulaks as they had the most to lose - two or three horse, several cows and a bigger than average size farm. This is exactly what happened as the kulaks overtly refused to share their resources and outputs which

  1. China 1945-90 - source based questions.

    Although agricultural infrastructure had been improved, actual production was adversely affected, because labor was diverted to steel production and other projects. Economic ministries, which had been seriously affected by the anti-rightist campaign, gave inaccurate reporting and planning, thereby worsening the economic situation.

  2. Stalin Sources Questions

    But in all truth the people whom he expelled were infact the people who helped and supported him the most through the early stages of his leadership. Stalin was not "immersed" in popularity amongst his people but on the other hand he was not despised either.

  1. The blance sheet for russia.

    But above all from the standpoint of the peasantry, formal parliamentary democracy is worse than useless if it does not carry out policies that solve their most pressing needs. Under certain circumstances, the Constituent Assembly could have played a progressive role.

  2. Free essay

    Fall of Tsarist Regime was to be Expected

    However, I agree with this statement to a small extent. The fall of the Tsarist Regime fell partially due to completely unforeseen circumstances like World War 1. During World War 1, over 15 million men left Russia to join the army.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work