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To what extent had Germany been Nazified by 1939 ?

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To what extent had Germany been Nazified by 1939 ? As soon as Hitler came into power in 1933 he began to pump his ideological views and policies into the minds of the Germen people. This was essential to create a 'volksgemeinschaft' and to begin his process of Nazification in Germany with the purpose of controlling and gaining support of the German community. In order for him to do this he needed a way of getting through to the people of Germany and did this by creating the German Labour Front, arranging youth and women's organizations and controlling religion and education throughout Germany. The Nazis felt it was important to win the support of the working classes, as most unskilled workers had been committed to either the SPD or KPD. However, most skilled workers supported the Nazis before 1933. One of the measures taken to establish a disciplined workforce was the creation of the DAF (German Labour Front). ...read more.


The middle classes were Hitler's most dedicated supporters, which consisted of small business owners, traders, craft workers, clerks and shopkeepers. Most peasant farmers supported the Nazis, as their ideological views on them were that they were honest, racially pure and hard working. The Nazis put forward a policy of 'blood and soil' for the rural 'volkgemeinschaft' in order to provide cheap food for the cities. The Nazi policies towards women were very stereotypical and their duty was to produce Aryan children and work in the home. Women were awarded the 'Mother's cross' in 1939 if they had a large family. The Nazis set up the 'Women's Front' in May 1933 to bring women into line with Nazi ideology. It was because of this policy that many German women lost their jobs. Although, as the economic situation improved many women regained their jobs and by 1939 seven per cent of all doctors were women compared to the five per cent in 1930. ...read more.


They changed the curriculum to promote Nazi beliefs and fired all Jewish teachers. The curriculum prioritised sport, history and German Studies. The National Socialist Teachers' alliance was formed to indoctrinate teachers with Nazi ideology. There was a great deal of tension between the Church and the Nazis because if their contradicting ideologies. In 1933 Hitler wanted to 'stamp out Christianity' in Germany and endorse 'positive Christianity' which meant that he would discard Catholicism and Protestantism. The German Faith Movement was set up in 1934 to promote 'positive Christianity'. It campaigned against Christian rituals in schools and its members paganised these rituals. In consideration, Germany had been Nazified to the extent that they had managed to control most of Germany through their organizations and constant reminders of Nazi ideology. However, not everyone went along with the Nazi beliefs. I think that the Nazis changed the education in Germany more than any other area because it was the most important to maintain the Greater German Reich in the future. ...read more.

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