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To What Extent was British Appeasement to Germany in the Interwar Period Justified?

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Introduction

TO WHAT EXTENT WAS BRITISH APPEASEMENT TO GERMANY IN THE INTERWAR PERIOD JUSTIFIED? Ivan Tang D 0624-018 1960 words Table of Contents A Plan of the investigation 1 B Summary of evidence 1 C Evaluation of sources 3 D Analysis 4 E Conclusion 6 F List of Sources 7 To what extent was British appeasement to Germany in the Interwar Period justified? A Plan of the investigation This objective of this investigation is to evaluate whether Britain's policy of appeasement towards Germany was a justified action. Two main contrary arguments are to be discussed. Firstly, British appeasement to Germany was justified in order to maintain peace and to buy time to build up armaments in preparation for another war, if the occasion arose. The opposing argument is that appeasement was not justified because it allowed Adolf Hitler and Germany to expand the German military, thus opening the door for a Nazi takeover of Europe and consequently completing the Third Reich. The method of investigation involves several steps, which include comparing differing viewpoints of historians, evaluating the two main sources from which the opposing viewpoints are extracted, taking into particular consideration the time in which they were written, their aim, and their limitation, and finally analyzing the sources in detail keeping in mind such things as bias. ...read more.

Middle

There is an introduction regarding appeasement, and then analyses. All factual information was presented objectively, which is the ideal method. However, some of Darby's personal bias was incorporated into the analyses, making it limited, despite attempting to be entirely impartial. For example, Darby states: "Churchill's alternative belligerent approach, some might say, was based on a romantic unrealistic view of Britain's position in the world,"14 He writes that, "Chamberlain was a decent man who had lost relatives in the slaughter of 1914-18,"15 and later, he states bluntly that "Hitler caused the war,"16 From these extracts, it appears that he's sympathetic towards Chamberlain and the appeasement policy. British Politics and Foreign Policy in the Age of Appeasement, 1935-39, was written by R.J.Q. Adams, in which he "examines the policy of appeasement...[and] explains the motivations and goals of the principal policy-makers,"17 Despite in-depth analyses, Adams' presentation is much more opinionated when juxtaposed against Darby's work. For example, "There seems to be little doubt that the slightest armed resistance by Britain and France would have stopped the march into the Rhineland dead in its tracks...The [British] Cabinet did not do what was clearly best for the nation and the world because they failed to understand...Hitler was strengthened not weakened,"18 These extracts clearly show bias. Both sources are good for providing information but because of the biases, one must use them cautiously. ...read more.

Conclusion

Stanford University Press; Stanford, California. * Best, Geoffrey (2001) Churchill: A Study in Greatness. Hambledon and London; Great Britain. * Chamberlain, William Henry (1962) Appeasement: Road to War. Rolton House Inc.; New York, United States. Published simultaneously by Burns and MacEachern; Canada. * Darby, Graham (1999) Hitler, Appeasement, and the Road to War 1933-41. Hodder & Stoughton; London, Great Britain. * Shen, Peijian (1999) The Age of Appeasement: The Evolution of British Foreign Policy in the 1930s. Sutton Publishing Limited; Gloucestershire, Great Britain. 1 Chamberlain, William Henry (1962) Appeasement: Road to War. Rolton House Inc.; New York, United States. inside cover 2 Darby, Graham (1999) Hitler, Appeasement, and the Road to War 1933-41. Hodder & Stoughton; London, Great Britain. p.63. 3 Ibid, p.69. 4 Ibid, p.71. 5 Ibid, p.72. 6 Ibid, p.73. 7 Ibid, p.75. 8 Ibid, p.81. 9 Ibid, p.81. 10 Adams, R.J.Q. (1993) British Politics and Foreign Policy in the Age of Appeasement, 1935-39. Stanford University Press; Stanford, California. p.47. 11 Ibid, p.48. 12 Darby, back cover. 13 Ibid, preface (by Pearce, Robert). 14 Ibid, p.81. 15 Ibid. 16 Ibid. 17 Adams, back cover. 18 Ibid, p.48. 19 Darby, p.79. 20 Ibid, p.76. 21 Best, Geoffrey (2001) Churchill: A Study in Greatness. Hambledon and London; Great Britain. p.153. 22 Darby, p.79. 23 Adams, p.2. 24 Shen, Peijian (1999) The Age of Appeasement: The Evolution of British Foreign Policy in the 1930s. Sutton Publishing Limited; Gloucestershire, Great Britain. introduction. ?? ?? ?? ?? D 0624-018 7 ...read more.

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