• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To what extent was the League of Nations a success?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

To what extent was the League of Nations a success? The League of Nations faced many problems, but was it a success? In my opinion the League was equally successful as it was a failure but because the failures were a lot more famous the successes were not as well noticed. I am going to show the successes and the failures of the league to try and show that my point is correct. The league's main successes came not from fighting but from helping to resolve the problems caused by the violence of the First World War. After the First World War many people were left homeless and the League helped to solve the large refugee problem. In the Treaty of Versailles, German and Turkish colonies were put under temporary control of Britain and France and were kept a close eye on by the mandates Commission until it was felt that these countries were able to govern themselves. Another success of the league was the International labour organisation, which was founded in 1919 and was linked to the work of the League of Nations. However non-league countries could also join. It helped to encourage the formation of trade unions and to improve working conditions, pensions and minimum wage schemes across the world. ...read more.

Middle

and also economic sanctions would be useless without the cooperation of the USA who was Japan's main trading partner. Another thing that could have been done would be to impose military sanctions but neither France nor Britain were willing to risk their armies and navies and even if they did it would require of army of the size of the USSR or the USA and neither of these was a member of the league. The only thing left the league could do would be to try and persuade the countries to reach a compromise. Lord Lytton of Britain was sent to investigate and a year later he produced a report to try and satisfy both sides. It suggested that the Japanese would leave Manchuria but that it would carry on being a semi-independent state free from Chinese rule. In response the Japanese resigned from the league and continued to occupy the Chinese providence known as Jehol. The Manchurian crisis had knock on affects for the league, because now even it's strongest supporters seemed doubtful about whether or not it could maintain world peace. The next big failure for the league came in 1935 in the Abyssinia crisis. In the 1930's almost all of Africa was part of some European empire and only two states remained independent, one of these states was Abyssinia. ...read more.

Conclusion

In December 1932 an agreement for equality was agreed and in January Germany announced that they were coming back. In February Hitler became chancellor and immediately began secretly re-arming. In May Hitler promised not to disarm if in 5 years all other nations destroyed their arms. In June, Britain produced a disarmament plan and in October Germany withdrew from the disarmament conference and later from the league altogether. Disarmament had failed. Many felt that is was because Britain and France were divided on the issue, because in 1935 Britain much to the French dismay signed a treaty with Germany which allowed it to rebuild it's navy as long as it stayed below 35% of Britain's. In conclusion, I still agree with my original statement that the League of Nations was as much a success as it was a failure because although the failures of the League were more public and infamous the successes of the League were equally important if less prominent. In particular I consider that the fact that the League maintained its commitment to peaceful solutions to problems in the face of adversity was its strongest legacy, even though these solutions were not always successful. I believe that the main factor that caused the failure of the League was the Great Depression as this caused the main Powers of the League to become selfish and uncooperative. If the Great Depression had not happened I believe that the League would have been more successful. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE International relations 1900-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE International relations 1900-1939 essays

  1. "Was the treaty of Versailles fair?"

    Altogether Germany lost 6 million people. This essay will now look at another aspect of punishment that was laid out by the treaty of Versailles. The above two paragraphs gave points about how Germany lost money financially. This would be a major issue when you consider that Germany had to pay reparations .

  2. What Were the Main Criticisms of the League of Nations and To What Extent ...

    For the reason that the League had several successes as well as numerous failures, the many criticisms of the League, though for the most part valid, are not entirely justified. There are many instances which clearly illustrate the criticisms of the League of Nations.

  1. Why was the Abyssinian crisis a death blow to the league when the Manchurian ...

    as they were all the way around the other side of the world. The Chinese and Japanese were also at least in the same stage of technology where as the Italians were very much more advanced than the Abyssinians. The Abyssinians basically had spears and bows against the Italians planes and machine guns.

  2. How successful was Bismarckas Chancellor in his foreign policies between 1871-1890?

    What about his colonial policies? What were his decisions at a time when European powers such as Britain had vast Empires spread all over the world? In fact, he only undertook a colonial policy in the 1880s, when he authorised his government to form a body of important German possessions.

  1. 'The rise and decline of the great powers can be explained by their relative ...

    As the only country to outline ideas for peace after the war, Wilson quickly got his way, gaining large influence over the affairs of the other countries and thus gaining power quickly. This gain of power was at the cost of Germany, although Wilson was the most sympathetic towards Germany of the Big 3.

  2. The Success Of Blitzkrieg II.

    On May 18th 1940 Gamelan was sacked and replaced by Leyland who himself was 73 years old, and so you could almost say that the French made their own defeat because they sacked a person who had old fashioned methods of warfare and replaced him with someone who had even older methods of warfare.

  1. Was the League of Nations a Success or Failure?

    It softened the trouble of war reparations, stabilised the currency. However, it made the German economy rely on foreign economies, and the Great Depression would damage Germany. The Corfu Incident in 1923, the border between Italy and Albania was far from clear and the Treaty of Versailles had never really addressed this issue.

  2. The League of Nations: Its achievements and its failures

    and helped the League in its work: The Locarno treaties and the Kellogg-Briand Pact. The Locarno Treaties: Representatives of France, Britain, Germany, Italy, Belgium, Poland and Czechoslovakia met in Locarno in Switzerland in October 1925. Important agreements emerged after many days of hard negotiating: -Germany was to finally accept the

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work