• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

To What Extent Was There Opposition To Hitler 1933-45?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

To What Extent Was There Opposition To Hitler 1933-45? Hitler suffered opposition during his time in power however it is likely there would have been more outspoken and meaningful opposition if he had not created so many laws to ban it. It is difficult to measure the amount of public opposition to Hitler as the majority took place behind closed doors and could not be spoken in the public domain or recorded as it was against the law. Many people who spoke out were punished through jail or violence by the Nazi's, the Nazi's would find out about these people and their thoughts by being tipped off by other members of the public. This led to less outspoken anti Nazi views, this reduced outspoken opposition however in many instances it would not have changed the individuals beliefs it may well have prevented them from preaching to others about their beliefs and acting upon them. ...read more.

Middle

There was a small-scale opposition towards the end of the regime by Edelweiss Pirates and some youth groups especially in regions where Nazi support was lower e.g. Cologne in 1944. The elites of society also opposed Hitler towards the end of his reign in 1944. There is also a small amount of evidence of a few planned assassinations; however there was more non-compliance and non-co-operation than actual resistance or planned assignations. Though the Nazi's would deem non-compliance as opposition. A large factor as to why there was limited opposition to the Nazi's was the totalitarian control the Nazi's had over law making which outlawed political parties and banned outspoken opposition. However it was also the propaganda tactics they used which convinced the public the Nazi's were the best thing for Germany as they controlled the media and used campaigns, ...read more.

Conclusion

There was also no official opposition to the Nazi's due to the ban over other political parties. This left no spokespeople of especially learned politically aware people to be leaders of opposition and to rally public support. All writings, books, newspapers, radio programmes that opposed Nazi's were banned and the Nazi's promoted themselves shamelessly using propaganda to their advantage. Nazi's also used threats to stop the public speaking out against them and encouraged people to be good Germans by reporting those that did. By appealing to the German publics previously bruised national identity and ego's the Nazi's managed to paint a picture of Germany being best under them. It is difficult to measure opposition and many Germans may not have agreed with the Nazi's and Hitler but there is little evidence of recorded, outspoken, official opposition to them. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. Nazi Strengths and Opposition Weaknesses

    which unfortunately, which was exactly what it didn't need during the depression. The people knew however that one strong leader could take firm decisive action and so could prevent the depression from happening once again. Scheming Of Hindenburg And Von Papen Hindenburg and Von Papen both thought that in turn they could hold Hitler down and they were both wrong.

  2. Thr opposition of the Church.

    This led to deep divisions among German clergy about what they really believed and what they were supposed to do in their new situation. For the most part, the influences that motivated and guided the German Churches in the Thirties and Forties essentially paralysed these institutions' potential challenges to Nazism, or led them to implicitly (though reluctantly)

  1. To What Extent Was Hitler a Totalitarian Dictator?

    German children were taught anti-Semitism from a young age and Jewish children were prevented from attending German schools, and were sent to Jewish only schools. There were many instances of humiliation and abuse including when Jewish Lawyer Michael Siegal was forced to wear a placard proclaiming 'I am a Jew, I will never again complain about the Nazis.'

  2. Why was opposition to Nazi persecution of minorities so unsuccessful in the years 1933-45?

    its territory which had contained 48% of its iron production and 15 per cent of its agriculture production as well as six million of its people. This was not the end of it as Germany had to hand over 90% of its merchant ships covering the loss of the u-boats.

  1. To what extent was the severity of Nazi repression an indication of the strength ...

    However, it was not long before the Gestapo found out about the leaflets and began to search for the producers. In an attempt to try and repress the resistance, a blunt and insulting speech was given to the University

  2. ­­How much support was there for the Nazi regime between 1933 and 1939?

    will soon be criticised, yet only mentions any support, or positive factor at the end. This positive factor is that many newly employed people regard the new work through rearmament as a "great feat". The question says "What did the author of this source think was the extent of support for the Nazi regime by autumn 1936?"

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work