• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Treaty of Versailles.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

HISTORY TREATY OF VERSAILLES Background to the Treaty Made at the Paris peace conference in the palace of Versailles. Important decisions by big three (UK, France, USA). Problems from the start as Wilson was ill. Supported by diplomats and experts but didn't take their advice. Treaty of Versailles a model for the other treaties. Mood in 1919 - strong feelings that Germany responsible for war and should be punished. Economy bad in all countries so USA and UK wanted to gain as much as possible. Ordinary people had shortages of food etc. Politicians in victor countries knew that they could get support if they promised hard policies on Germanys. Germany treated Russia badly in Brest-Litovsk so the allies used this as further evidence to punish Germany. Terms of the Treaty War guilt. Germany accept blame for starting war and this lead to the reparation bill. Armed forces. Army limited to 100,000, conscription banned, not allowed submarines, aircraft or armored vehicles, only 6 battleships, Rhineland demilitarized. Reparations. �6600 million - enormous figure and Germany was not consulted. Territories and colonies. - Overseas empire taken away and colonies became mandates to UK and France e.g. ...read more.

Middle

Economy was in a mess so reparations would cripple people. Army was a symbol of pride - felt it unfair no one else disarmed. Lost money as a result of loss of territories. Insulted that it wasn't invited to join the League of Nations. Germany felt not in keeping with Wilson's 14 points - self determination. Germany fell behind on reparations in 1922. 1923 French and Belgium troops took what was owed. German government ordered strike but French killed 100 workers. No goods so government printed more money � hyperinflation. Also criticised by big three: Clemenceau - not harsh enough. Wilson - disappointed and US didn't approve it. Lloyd George - received heroes welcome back but said it would lead to another war. Contemporary Opinions People now realize how unfair it was Reparation bill was too high Like Lloyd George suggested it did lead to another war Big three all had the same aim of peace but they had different ways of going about it What Britain and France wanted were both very different so they could not both get what they wanted All the big three had to compromise on their ideas especially Wilson's 14 points Woodrow Wilson's 14 Points 1. ...read more.

Conclusion

Slavery commission Main aim was to abolish slavery. Aims and objectives Discourage aggression Encourage cooperation (i.e. trade) Encourage disarmament Improve social conditions Why America didn't join Although the League of Nations was much of the work of President Woodrow Wilson America never joined the League of Nations. This was for several reasons, firstly America had suffered civilian casualties in the war, and many people citizens in the USA wanted to keep America out of European affairs. This policy was called isolationism and was probably the main reason that America didn't join the League. Also joining the league meant that this might involve having to do things that might set back the economy or damage America otherwise. For instance sending out soldiers out to other parts of the globe would be a very costly venture and there would probably be casualties as well. There was also the fact that America had had little involvement in the war and had some civilians (especially German immigrants) also had little or no support for British or French policies and/or the Treaty of Versailles. So although when the League was actually being formed Woodrow Wilson still backed America joining it, by this time America had had enough of wars and dealing with other countries problems and, despite Wilson America never joined the League. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE International relations 1900-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE International relations 1900-1939 essays

  1. "Was the treaty of Versailles fair?"

    Like Clemenceau, he didn't get a lot of what he wanted, but the most important ideas were included in the treaty. Lloyd-George was probably the most content out of the three leaders, because he had wanted a compromise between the French and American ideas to begin with.

  2. Who was most pleased with the Treaty of Versailles. Woodrow Wilson or George Clemenceau?

    Wilson was one of these. He was an idealist but not realistic. Compared to Clemenceau, he was way out of his league (excuse the pun) in political terms. Wilson's aims for the peace treaty included the creation of a League of Nations set up so another war of the same magnitude couldn't occur again.

  1. The League of Nations was formed after the First World War, during 1919 at ...

    (These are vital to modern warfare.) So half-hearted were the sanctions that Italy was able to complete the conquest of Abyssina by May 1936. A few weeks later sanctions were abandoned and Mussolini had flouted theLaeague. Britain and France had not wanted to antagonise Mussolini and had even tried to

  2. Versailles and Hyperinflation, Germany 1919-28.

    Inflation had been occurring since 1914, so was a long-term cause of the economic crisis. When Germany lost the Great War to the allies, they had to agree with the terms of the 'treaty of Versailles'. One of the terms of this treaty was that Germany had to lose land to France, Belgium, Denmark, Poland and the League of Nations.

  1. Field Marshall Haig: 'The Butcher of the Somme'?

    However, it is not often that historians can see such re-enactments, and may therefore help to give a better understanding of the conditions the soldiers lived in and their corresponding opinions. Furthermore, this re-enactment is likely to be based on reasonably accurate information regarding these conditions and opinions, as the writer's (Ben Elton)

  2. The Antarctic Treaty: When and why was the treaty formed?

    * The Convention for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). This convention covers an area larger than the treaty. The boundary used is the Antarctic Convergence - the zone where the cold water of the Antarctic meets warmer water, or the biological boundary between the Antarctic and the sub-Antarctic ecosystems at about 58�S.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work