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U.S. foreign policy after the World Wars.

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Introduction

Essay 25 U.S. foreign policy has always been characterized by a commitment to free trade, protection of American interests, and a concern for human rights. The United States foreign policy after World War I was isolationism and withdrawal from world affairs, in which they refused to join the League of Nations. After World War II, there was full engagement with world affairs on a global scale. In the United States foreign policy post World War I, there was restricted immigration with the Emergency Quota Act and the Immigration Act. ...read more.

Middle

The US was sought to limit future warfare by the Kellogg-Briand Pact that outlawed war as a means of problem solving. The United States sought to find communists and other agitators through the Espionage Act and the Sedition Act. In the United States foreign policy post World War II, the US was heavily involved in foreign affairs through the policy of Containment hopes of stopping the spread of Communism. The Truman Doctrine stated that the US would support Greece and Turkey with economic military aid. ...read more.

Conclusion

During the Eisenhower administration the government extended its containment policy to cover the Middle East as well as following the Suez Canal crisis. This came to be known as the Eisenhower Doctrine. In conclusion, the United States foreign policy after World War I was isolationism and withdrawal from world affairs, in which they refused to join the League of Nations and after World War II, there was full engagement with world affairs on a global scale. There was restricted immigration with the Emergency Quota Act and the Immigration Act. The US was heavily involved in foreign affairs through the policy of Containment hopes of stopping the spread of Communism. ...read more.

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Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

This is a well structured and clearly written response, with excellent knowledge of the relevant pieces of US legislation. More dates could have been included however, and not all points were explained or linked to the question. Reasoning could have been taken further in the conclusion. 4 out of 5 stars.

Marked by teacher Natalya Luck 30/09/2012

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