• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Was Hitler A Talitorian Dictator?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Was Hitler A Talitorian Dictator? By Nikhil Shah To a certain extent, Hitler was a Talitorian Dictator. He led a one party state that essentially controlled the lives of the German population from the cradle to the grave. Hitler exploited three main tactics to institute and fortify his dictatorship; the manoeuvring of the German legal system, the use of brutal terror; and sly propaganda. The Hitler did various things to manipulate the German legal system, he began with the Reichstag was burnt down by a mad Dutchman, named Maranus Vandelu. Hitler used this current situation to his advantage, by saying, it was a communist act, and in doing so, he asked Hindenburg for complete control over Germany on a temporary basis, to get rid of them. As the delegates of the German parliament were terrified of a communist revolution, they gave him what he asked for, and the Enabling Act was passed in March 1933. Thus, giving him the power to make and pass any law he wished without even consulting or needing a vote in the Reichstag. In essence, it established Hitler's political dictatorship over night. Along side the Enabling Act, Hitler banned all KPD/SPD parties' i.e. ...read more.

Middle

It consisted of the SD, which was responsible for state security, the wauffen SS units, supported the army, death head units, which were controlled by the concentration camps, and finally the Gestapo's-which searched out the enemies of the state (under Himmler). All these methods of torture were widely used in conjunction with the D.11 form. By 1939, Hitler had imprisoned a 162,000 Germans without a trial. Fundamentally, through terror, no one dared say anything different, thus giving him the support of the people. In 1934, on the 30th June, Hitler had ordered the SA to murder Rohm along with the SA leaders. There two main reasons he did this: Rohm was a major threat to his leadership, and even though he had helped him to get to power, he was his greatest rival, and could take the risk. Secondly, to carry out Hitler's plans he needed the backing of the army, and the army disliked Rohm, so with him out of the way, the army would now engage full support to Hitler. Concisely, Hitler had got rid of his rival, thus securing his leadership. Coupled with that, he made the army swear an oath of Hitler, not Germany, so the army would do as Hitler pleased with no concern of Germany's welfare. ...read more.

Conclusion

He did this through the Hitler myth, which covered three main aspects: he played with kids to show he was caring, he read books, implicating that he was clever and intellect, and he was seen in uniform, giving the thought that he was brave and strong (though in actual fact probably never achieved any medals). He did not need to be seen doing this, but these were the images portrayed through posters, billboards, newsreels etc. In basic terms, the image in the minds of the people of Hitler was kind, intellectual, brave and strong etc. these were the kind of qualities they wanted in a leader. Though Hitler may not have been all that, it eliminated any doubt throughout Germany of his leadership. This made Hitler look superhuman and thus gaining further support from German people, and thereby strengthening hid dictatorship. In my final analysis, Hitler was a Talitorian Dictator. He led a one party state that in fact controlled the lives of the German inhabitants from the cradle to the grave. To do this Hitler exploited three main tactics to establish and strengthen his dictatorship; the manoeuvring of the German legal system, the use of violent terror; and cunning propaganda. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. How did Hitler establish a dictatorship?

    On March 23, the newly elected Reichstag met in the Kroll Opera House in Berlin to consider passing Hitler's Enabling Act. It was officially called the "Law for Removing the Distress of the People and the Reich." If passed, it would in effect vote democracy out of existence in Germany and establish the legal dictatorship of Adolf Hitler.

  2. To what extent was Hitler a totalitarian dictator?

    Hitler was reluctant to make the people choose between the church and the state. The church and the Nazi policies are so indifferent that you could say the church was the antithesis of the Nazis. The church preaches 'love thy neighbour' this confronts the Nazi hatred for the Jews and disabled.

  1. To What Extent Had Hitler Legally Achieved A Dictatorship in Germany by 1934?

    Shortly after the failed rebellion, Hitler had entrusted the leadership of the group to Alfred Rosemberg, a man with little organisational experience and less personal authority over the group; qualifications which may have highly recommended him to Hitler. With it's leader arrested and it's organisation banned throughout Germany, the NSDAP floundered.

  2. To what extent was Hitler a weak dictator?

    He hated committees and gradually removed the government cabinets. These were the traditional methods of running the country. In 1933, the cabinet met 72 times, while in 1935 just 12 times and it was removed by 1938. Rather than concentrating on the problems the party faced, Hitler would immerse himself in pet projects such as architecture.

  1. adolf hitler

    Like an old friend. And those big blue eyes. Like stars. He is glad to see me. I am in heaven. That man has everything to be king." Hitler admired Goebbels' abilities as a writer and speaker. They shared an interest in propaganda and together they planned how the NSDAP would win the support of the German people.

  2. Thr opposition of the Church.

    Ecumenical documents show that from 1933 to 1945 there were Christian leaders inside and outside Germany who agonized about what they could do to stop Nazism and help its victims. The historical complexities suggested by these factors should never lead us to condone the Churches' failures during the Thirties and

  1. To What Extent Was Hitler a Totalitarian Dictator?

    Nazi Germany was a police state. There were two main groups: The SS or Schutzstaffel and the Gestapo or Geheime Staatspolizei. The SS was formed in 1925 from a group of Hitler fanatics and it was originally part of the SA. All of the members SS had to be fit, strong Aryan men.

  2. 'Hitler was a weak dictator' discuss

    All the confusion simply arose from the nature of Hitler's leadership and was certainly not deliberate policy. Also completely unrelated events and decisions such as the Holocaust can be used to examine Hitler and his decision-making, for example many historians such as Ian Kershaw believe that ideas such as the

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work