• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Was The Ending of White Minority Rule Achieved Only by Nelson Mandela?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Was The Ending of White Minority Rule Achieved Only by Nelson Mandela? In this essay, I will be seeing if I agree or not with the statement 'the ending of white minority rule was achieved only because of Nelson Mandela', by looking at lots of different factors. Mandela was a strong activist against apartheid and was imprisoned for 27 years because of this, in spite of becoming the first black South African President in 1994 until 1999. Even though he is a crucial part to the ending of apartheid, other people are also important, so I will be looking at them too. Apartheid was a law, introduced by Doctor Malan and the National party, which he was the head of, which legally segregated whites and non-whites almost completely from 1948 to 1994. His idea started when he was deeply affected at the sight of Afrikaan children playing with black children, and thought they should be separated. ...read more.

Middle

However, Mandela was found to have been involved in the planning of a sabotage after joining the MK, when the ANC became an underground organisation to take a more violent approach. This was trying to get rid of apartheid too, but it was not carried out. He was found guilty and was almost certain to be executed, but spoke out again in court and was sent to prison for 28 years. Considering that 28 years is a long time to say isolated from the world, therefore not being able to play much of a role in the ending of apartheid at this point, as he was not allowed to be quoted by newspapers for the fear of him encouraging others, you have to look at other factors to do with integration while he was there to see if they had a role too. In the 1950s and 60s, black governments were starting to replace white rule in some colonies in Africa. ...read more.

Conclusion

This was important as it started to get other countries involved and recognising the problem there. This would have put pressure on the government to abolish it. Also, pressure from the UN, the OAU and the Lusaka Conference was large for SA. The UN was a big country and every African nation wanted to be a part of it to help end apartheid. In the Lusaka Conference, the points were about racism, and how it should be condemned. This pressurised SA because it was a big organisation who were speaking out and could defy the SA government. African Nationalism was an important factor, as it gained support from other countries and helped replace white governments, and these helped to end apartheid. However, Mandela also tried to get other countries to recognise what was going on when he snuck out and also spoke out and gained support when he took part in things like the Defiance Campaign and the Freedom Charter, so in this case, I think Mandela was more important in ending apartheid. ?? ?? ?? ?? Ciara McCoy ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE History Projects section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

4 star(s)

This is a focused response, with balanced evidence and a conclusion reached. Perhaps more could have been conveyed about Mandela's role as a symbol and inspiration, despite his long imprisonment. However, the author is correct to recognise the role of other factors. 4 out of 5 stars.

Marked by teacher Natalya Luck 01/12/2012

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE History Projects essays

  1. How and why did castles change over time?

    Drawbridges could be closed quickly as they were hinged. The portcullis ( a heavy grid) strengthened the entrance. It could be raised and lowered quickly by machinery in the gatehouse above. In the entrance hall was the gate passage where defenders would drop rocks and boiling water on attackers from the roof and sides.

  2. Describe the political, social and religious situation of Palestine during the first century AD ...

    They earned little money already and had to pay a tithe (which is ten percent of your income) to the Temple, as well as Temple tax and then when the Romans came they had to shell out more money so the Romans could make powerful armies.

  1. Why was the Roman Army so Successful? Rome was one ...

    Before any war, the soldiers would closely research their enemy and find out the enemy's weaknesses and strengths. The Roman Soldiers had special weapons called the Auxiliaries. Auxiliaries were soldiers from other countries which were captured during previous wars. These men would usually be talented in a particular skill such as artery or horse back riding.

  2. The Causes of World War 1

    by which they had agreed to protect Bulgarian independence and so what started by the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand led to the most important chain of events that led to World War 1. Nationalism The Austro-Hungarian Empire was weak and the different nationalities within it wanted independence.

  1. The slave trade essay

    Another reason was that there was a very long history of slave trade in Africa many people thought that it was fine to trade people. The West Indies wanted to make money like the other countries involved in the trade.

  2. Which Religion Did More to Help or Hinder Medicine - Islam or Christianity?

    Islam Helped Medicine by easily allowing the use of Licensed Healers, both men and women to become Doctors and with more and more Hospitals opening it was impossible for the Hospitals to turn away the Doctors etc. Hindered Islam hindered Medicine by not spreading their knowledge of anatomy because Islam did not encourage new developments.

  1. The Political, Economic and Social Impacts of the First World War on Canada

    farm, but also for the war effort, which relied on food from farms to provide for soldiers at the front. Women took at these roles as farmers and were greatly appreciated from all over Canada. In 1917, Robert Borden, the Prime-Minster during World War One, passed the Wartime Elections Act.3

  2. Medicine Through Time Timeline

    The impact was slow and sporadic. In 1805 Napoleon had all his soldiers vaccinated. However, vaccination was not made compulsory in Britain until 1852. 1799 Humphrey Davy discovers the pain-killing attributes of Nitrous Oxide (Laughing Gas). It would become the main anaesthetic used in Dentistry. Horace Wells would try and get the gas international recognition.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work