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Was The Munich Putsch a Success or a Failure?

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Introduction

Was the Munich Putsch a Success or a Failure. Patrick Thompson In 1923 Hitler and the Nazis attempted a putsch at a beer hall in Munich. They attempted unsuccessfully to overthrow the Bavarian Government. This had a huge effect on the Nazis both positive and negative and short term and long term. In the short term the effects for the Nazi party where very negative. The Nazis where completely embarrassed Hitlers false sense of power lead him to believe he was more powerful than he actually was. The crowd of 3000 Nazis was overthrown by just 100 policemen resulting in 16 Nazi deaths and 3 Police deaths. ...read more.

Middle

with the Nazis in Bavaria and then the rest of Germany you could say that the Munich putsch was a complete failure simply because the fact that the Nazis did not actually overthrow the government the whole reason for the Putsch. However in the long term the Putsch had many positive effects for the Nazis. When Hitler was put on trial it gave him a platform to speak to the whole of Germany, he of course amazed the judges and the rest of Germany with his persuasive speeches people got to hear his views and many supported and agreed him, the party also got some much needed publicity making them very well known and gaining support for themselves even the judges ...read more.

Conclusion

Technically the Putsch was a failure Hitler did not carry out his objectives of taking power, the Nazis where embarrassed and the perpetrators were imprisoned but while this may all seem negative it actually helped in the long term Hitlers time in prison let him rethink his strategies which he was successful with, he also wrote "Mein Kampf" which sold amazingly well and the whole event really made the Nazis known in Germany Hitler had his chance to speak to all Germans many supported him. So in conclusion the short term effects of the Putsch were very negative but in the long term the failure of the Putsch actually helped the Nazis. ...read more.

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