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Was the Nazi seizure of power an inevitable consequence of the weakness of the Weimar Republic?

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Introduction

Was the Nazi seizure of power an inevitable consequence of the weakness of the Weimar Republic? The question of whether the Nazi seizure of power was an inevitable consequence of the weakness of Weimar is one that many historians have debated and questioned. It remains a central issue among scholars to date. The Nazi seizure of power is a debate in which there are many aspects of thinking. Was Weimar doomed to fail? Did the Republic have any other option but to be replaced by a dictatorship, or was there an alternative? Or controversially, was Hitler at the right place, at the right time? Many historians have argued that the Weimar Republic was doomed from birth, and therefore it was only inevitable that a stronger party would overthrow the Republic. However, many suggest there is more to the Nazi seizure of power than Weimar being a weak Republic. In order to look into the issue of whether the seizure of power by the Nazis, was an inevitable consequence of the weakness of the Republic a number of questions need to be analysed. ...read more.

Middle

Overall, we can see that the Weimar republic did not have an easy birth, and fought great difficulties, however, during the golden years the political and economic atmosphere was relatively stable, and brought hope to the republic, yet it was un-foreseeable circumstances that shocked and weakened the Republic.. The Nazi party or the NSDAP were politically active during the 1920s, however the NSDAP were a relatively small extremist group, and they were active in campaigning against the current government. The most famous early protest was the Beer Hall putsch, yet this sent Hitler to prison, and the NSDAP were less active during this time. Later, Hitler and his party played on the weaknesses of the republic, as well as the use of violence, and intimidation to control their opposition; this resulted in the creation of a climate of fear, helping the party win seats and elections. So to a small degree we can suggest he did seize power, yet, he did it in a manipulating way. The high unemployment and inflation was an aspect that Hitler protected about, he gave the public a scapegoat by blaming the November Criminals for the political atmosphere and environment Germany was in, saying they stabbed Germany in the back after accepting the treaty of Versailles. ...read more.

Conclusion

the Weimar republic as the republic allowed him into the Reich, it was his manipulation that acquired him the power to lead a dictatorship. Therefore, the term seized power is misleading, as he gained power through combination of political intrigue, and violence, as well as help from Hindenburg when he appointed him as chancellor, if it was not for these events Hitler may have never gained ruthless control of Germany. 1 Richard J Evan, The coming of the Third Reich, (Penguin Books 2004) pp.236-237 2 Richard J Evan, The coming of the Third Reich, (Penguin Books 2004) p.235 3 J Noakes, G Pridham, Nazism 1919-1945, the rise to power 1919-1934, (volumes 4, Devon, University of Exeter press 1996) p.64 4 Hitler and the collapse of Weimar p30 5 Richard Grunberger, Germany 1918-1945, (London B.T Batsford ltd1964) p85 6 Richard Grunberger, Germany 1918-1945, (London B.T Batsford ltd1964) p102 7 Ian Kershaw, Weimar: why did German democracy fail (London Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1990) p121 8 Ian Kershaw, Weimar: why did German democracy fail (London Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1990) P4. 9 Ian Kershaw, Weimar: why did German democracy fail (London Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1990) p6. 10 Ibid p21 11 Ibid p23 ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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