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Was the October Revolution inevitable

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Introduction

Was the October Revolution inevitable? By Linsey Misik The events leading up to the October revolution help give us insight into what the reasons for it were and why it was successful. However to understand whether or not the revolution was inevitable we need to focus on the influence of the political activists. Other key pressures on Russia were the cultural and social climates at the time which closely link to Alexander II reforms in the nineteenth century. Another important factor was Russia's domestic policies at the time and the economic failures; highlighted with the wars Russia had pursued with disastrous effects. This will provide us with an in depth knowledge of the time before the revolution involving many of the historian's viewpoints who have researched this time in Russian history. Other arguments involve the dichotomy of historical controversies that relate to this time period is the idea that Russia's new found economic growth before 1914 could have modernised industrial society without the bad affects of WWI or the opposition that states that the Tsar system was too inflexible and corrupt. The interesting and varied opinions to the build up of the revolution will give us an opportunity to take a closer look at this time. Tsar-Martyr Nicholas IIRussia's October Revolution occurred on October 25, 1917 (November 7, N.S.) ...read more.

Middle

This decision proved a big step into the beginning of the authoritarian reign of Lenin with the stark contrast of Martov's decorum in the background. This Lead Martov to the radical International Bolsheviks who were opposed to any coalition with the propertied classes, yet unwilling to accept the Bolshevik concept of the dictatorship of the working-class. Unfortunately the Russian Empire was not the country of great strength it was often portrayed as; in reality it was a difficult to govern. The country included a variety of different races, languages, religions and cultures which left Russia disunited. At this time it owned 800,000,000 square miles of land and covered two continents however to the ever-growing population this idea of a the great Russian empire was misleading. The census below shows that the country consisted of disproportionate amount peasant workers (82%) to other social classes, this equated to the lack of Russia's economical development. In such a vast country it was unable to maintain good communication in all its territories and the countries infrastructure was poor. Michael Lynch comment on the industry in Russia was that 'the sheer size of and her undeveloped roads and railways had proved an important limitation on industrial growth,' Ruling class (tsar, court and government) 0.5% Upper class (nobility, higher clergy, military officers) ...read more.

Conclusion

Comparative growth in national income 1894-1913 Italy 121% Austria-Hungary 79% France 52% Germany 58% Britain 70% European Russia 50% An interesting debate still rages regarding the Russian economy; if the war had no intervened would the economy have prevented revolution? An interesting debate, that's still ongoing however the Russian economist Alex Nove opinion is; 'If the growth rates characteristic if the period of the period 1890-1913 fir industry and agriculture were simply projected over the succeeding 50 years, no doubt citizens would be leading reasonable existence... however this assumes.....that there must be surely a limit to the game of what-might-of-been'. In conclusion we can see that the revolution was in fact pointing to the signs of revolution; the country was ruled in a rigid and out-of date with poor communication, backward farming methods, uneducated lower classes and poor foreign policy. The great reforms of De Witte were too late in the day to save Russia. The nail in the coffin had been the second Russian Congress of Soviets that undermined the Bolsheviks to create a multi-party and socialist democracy but instead facilitated the rise of Lenin's authoritarianism. Many historians views before the dissolution of the USSR was that Lenin inspired the working classes and produced a mass uprising. However when the archives were declassified we they showed that the coup d'�tat in October 1917 provided only a change of government and Russia still remained under a dictatorship therefore it is difficult to say whole-heartily whether or not the October revolution was inevitable. ...read more.

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