• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What Can We Learn From The Holocaust?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What Can We Learn From The Holocaust? In 1933, Germany's new leader suddenly found himself with the power to exterminate anyone in his country that couldn't contribute to his 'master race'. The leader, Adolf Hitler. His 'master race', People of pure German blood who were fit and healthy and definitely not Jewish. This was the start of Hitler's plan to destroy the Jewish community. 1939 was the year that war broke out between Britain and France (the Allies) and Nazi Germany. Propaganda was a major part, for both armies, to keep up morale and to try and get them to hate the other army as much as possible. Hitler placed Goebbels as Germany's propaganda leader which caused many disturbing movies to be shown about Jewish people and how they should be mis-treated. Hitler had everything from maths equations to radio messages persuading the country to dislike Jews as much as possible. His hate for the Jews and other groups of people, such as Communists, the mentally ill, gypsies and opposing political leaders, seemed to start when Hitler was younger and travelled to Vienna to start his career. ...read more.

Middle

Hitler needed to exterminate these adults and children. And quickly. The 'final solution' was the Nazis' code name for the deliberate, carefully planned destruction, or genocide, of all European Jews. The Nazis used the vague term 'final solution' to hide their policy of mass murder from the rest of the world. Using The SS to shoot randomly in Ghettos to try and stop overcrowding was no longer working. Something quicker and cheaper needed to be invented that could wipe out the Jewish population forever. A meeting was started at Wannsee by Reinhard Heydrich to discuss the matter. In the months following the Wannsee Conference, the Nazi regime continued to carry out their plans for the 'Final Solution.' Jews were deported, transported by trains or trucks to six camps, all located in occupied Poland: Chelmno, Treblinka, Sobibor, Belzec, Auschwitz-Birkenau, and Majdanek-Lublin. The Nazis called these six camps extermination camps. Most of the deportees were immediately murdered in large groups by poisonous gas. ...read more.

Conclusion

Rape and awful beatings were common amongst the Aushwitz victims. Most prisoners at Auschwitz survived only a few weeks or months. Those who were too ill or too weak to work were condemned to death in the gas chambers. Some committed suicide by throwing themselves against the electric wires. Others resembled walking corpses, broken in body and spirit. From these terrible times in history we should learn from them that it should never happen again. It is a constant reminder of what can happen if we don't look out for one another. It teaches us to value our freedom and our democracy. To learn more about our fellow countries so we can help them when they need us. It teaches us how cruel and evil mankind can be. We need to save hundreds of people that are suffering the same fate as the Jews and gypsies did over 50 years ago. If we raise awareness then hopefully we can cause an uprising if anything like it will happen again. People always learn from their mistakes. By Bethan Siddons 9K1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. The responsibility of the Holocaust can always be argued. It is not as simple ...

    Most Germans supported the policy of mass murder and between 100,000 and 500,000 Germans were directly implicated in it. An example of the implication to the discrimination of the Jews was the kristallnacht. The German people fuelled by the words of Joseph Goebbals went on a riot through the streets destroying all Jewish shops and burning synagogues.

  2. Why did the Holocaust happen?

    However these acts of discrimination by the Nazi party became violent and soon enough the Jews were being persecuted and punished severely for no apparent reason. 1938 November 9-19th Kristallnacht ' the night of the broken glass' when the Nazis began violently attacking Jews and destroying property.

  1. Why did the Holocaust Happen?

    many more banners in streets just like this and many books with similar illustrations and writings. Because of this, I know that anti-Semitism was very widespread and vicious in Nazi Germany and the majority of Germans cared little for Jewish people's feelings.

  2. The Holocaust

    If any Jews are leading employees in business, they will be dismissed after six months. This also shows that Ordinary Germans would be affected. The Nazis were training the Germans to takeover Jewish businesses. Source e is from a letter written by a German Jew in February 1939.

  1. What was the Holocaust?

    Plasow was a forced labour camp, which meant that Jews were not necessarily exterminated immediately, instead they done manual labour. The proceeds of this labour and hard work went towards the Nazi government. The Jews, however, whom were classified as non-essential workers were stripped naked and put back on the

  2. Describe how Jews were persecuted in the twentieth century before the Holocaust.

    Now, they were no longer citizens, therefore, no longer protected by the state. This was bad as it meant that anything could happen to them. For Hitler, it was perfect. Some caught onto Hitler's plan, and knew things were getting bad.

  1. Why did the Holocaust happen?

    In 'Mein Kampf', he wrote the ideals of the Nazi party. He alleged that the Aryan Race (of whom the Germans were the purest example) were the most superior race and that the Jews were the most inferior. He also states many other things including his hatred of the Treaty of Versailles.

  2. The Holocaust- No Hitler, No Holocaust?

    Hitler's biographer, Ian Kershaw, finds that "the 'Jewish question' was of no more than minimal interest to the vast majority of Germans during the war years.... Popular opinion, largely indifferent and infused with latent anti-Semitic feeling... provided the climate within which spiralling Nazi aggression towards the Jews could take place unchallenged.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work