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What can you learn from source A about the reasons given by the Suffragettes for demanding votes for women?

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Introduction

1. Study source A: What can you learn from source A about the reasons given by the Suffragettes for demanding votes for women? Source A is a poster produced by a Suffragette in 1912. The message was pure propaganda. The poster shows a sample of reasons that the Suffragettes gave for demanding votes for women. The message they were trying to deliver was that many men who have the right to vote are less deserving than many women in society. Women with honourable jobs such as a doctor or a teacher are refused the right to vote whereas many men who are allowed to vote are convicts and drunkards. Female mayors were voted for but were not allowed to vote themselves. ...read more.

Middle

Drunkards, if they were capable of finding their way to the polling station, would not be able to make important political decisions. A proprietor of white slaves would simply vote irrationally for whoever would, for example, make them pay the least tax. Lunatics do not know enough about the subject to vote sensibly. However, were authorized the vote by the government. 2. Study sources B and C: Does source B support the evidence of source C about the Suffragette campaign? Explain your answer. Source B, taken from a book written in 1907 by Marie Corelli, states that women were to make voters, not to vote themselves. Source C, a cartoon drawn in 1906 by Bernard Partridge is clearly on the suffragist's side as they are described as the 'sensible women' and the suffragettes are described as the 'shrieking sisters'. ...read more.

Conclusion

The writer of source C is not against women's right to vote but is against achieving it the suffragette's way. The writer of source B evidently feels strongly against the suffragettes as the title of her book is 'Woman or Suffragette?' meaning that one could either be a woman or a suffragette, suggesting that suffragettes were not eligible women and should not be classed under the same category as the 'sensible' women who hide in the shadows and fulfil the traditional role of women in that period. The book in source C is a rational argument whereas in source C, the tone is hostile and critical and suggests that the suffragettes cannot be taken seriously. ...read more.

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