• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What disadvantages did Catholics face in Northern Ireland in the mid 60's.

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What disadvantages did Catholics face in Northern Ireland in the mid 60's. In Northern Ireland during the 60's Catholics faced a lot of disadvantages, in areas of Employment, Education, Housing, and Politics; there is evidence that even the Police Force was biased in favour of the Protestant community. Employment was a major area in which Catholics faced discrimination. Protestants held most of the civil service, government and local government posts in Northern Ireland and even if a catholic did get employment, many would simply feel too uncomfortable in the midst of all the Protestants. The main companies were privately owned and although anti-catholic prejudice was often suspected among foremen or personal managers, it was a hard thing to prove. One fact that can be confirmed however is that, of 10,000 workers in a Belfast shipyard (the biggest single source of employment in the city), just 400 were Catholic. ...read more.

Middle

"....you learned very quickly from the other children at school that Catholics couldn't get jobs in a whole range of occupations." In the 1960's the government built a new city called Craigavon in the county of Derry, but only built 5 Catholic schools, despite the fact that 48% of children in Northern Ireland were Catholics. This discouraged Catholics from moving there. This would cause them to move elsewhere where there was less prejudice and they could start building foundations. However this had a dreadful affect on the housing and living conditions. In some cases, Catholic families were bunched up, 3 families to a house. Following a massive slum clearance effort in the post-war years, when N. Ireland was experiencing a genuine period of economic prosperity, Catholics believed that council houses were being unfairly allotted to Protestant families rather than on the basis of need. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Police in Northern Ireland were 99.9% Protestant and extremely biased and violent towards Catholics, they would attack innocent Catholics for no reason. The 'B-Specials' were created - this was a Protestant unit within the police. They were called in by the Unionists, to act like a police force/army. Catholic marches were banned. Student demonstrations ended up in violence. They treated Catholic civilians harshly which increased hatred between the two religious groups. Only 14.5% of Catholics were in the police force but they formed 40% of Northern Ireland's population. In conclusion there were many differences between Catholics and Protestants in the 1960s. Most of these differences were in opinion and in Politics. Nationalist politicians were always out numbered by Unionist politicians in large Nationalist areas. Therefore, Catholics could not have their views expressed and always lost out if it came to a majority vote. This unfair treatment halted progress to achieve peace in Northern Ireland and they are still trying to achieve peace to this day. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Northern Ireland 1965-85 essays

  1. Ireland - What are the main differences between the beliefs of the Republicans/Nationalists and ...

    This giving over of the North showed that most people didn't want to fight, and that both British and Irish governments were trying to compromise for peace. In 1998, 71% of voters voted for the Good Friday Agreement. This was a very important breakthrough.

  2. The History of Conflict in Ireland.

    The whole movement revolted against the notion of criminalization. And the way they did so was through the powerful symbol of just how powerless they were. They refused to wear the prison clothes, and so, therefore, they wrapped themselves in a blanket. Their imagery was the imagery of Christ at Calvary.

  1. How Did the Catholics Grow To hate the Protestants?

    Proof that they're against the peace process is the recent event of Holy Cross Primary School where Catholics had to walk through Protestant land to get to school and the Protestants were shouting and throwing things at them. Also the Orange Order hold annual marches to show their Protestant beliefs.

  2. Describe the disadvantages faced by Catholics in Northern Ireland in the mid-1960s.

    would re-emerge to defend the Catholics, and thus to try to bring the whole situation to a peaceful close, the British 'troops were sent in.' (E) The job of the police is to enforce law and order within the nation and we soon learn that many policemen 'were guilty of misconduct' (A)

  1. Describe the disadvantages faced by the Catholics in Northern Ireland in the mid- 1960s?

    Therefore the Protestant and Catholics joined forces and campaigned about where the university was being built. So in this case it is not only a problem for the Catholics living in Londonderry but also the Protestants. From the census there is information that a lot of Catholics would stay on

  2. Describe the disadvantages faced by Catholics in Northern Ireland in the mid 60's? The ...

    Protestant gave a priority to protestant in allocating council houses. Also new council houses were built in protestant areas as a result Catholics lived in very poor housing. Source D is an illustration of how Catholics lived in diabolical house conditions.

  1. Describe the disadvantages faced by the Catholics in Northern Ireland in the mid-1960s.

    the nice estates are going to the Protestants, the Catholics will be forced to go into slum housing or not so good accommodation. By the Protestants taking up all the good housing, Catholics protested by squatting in their homes. The schooling in Northern Ireland consisted of the Protestants going to the state schools and the Catholics going to church-run schools.

  2. Describe the disadvantages faced by Catholics in Northern Ireland in the mid 1960's.

    I believe that in the next few years, the situation in Northern Ireland will continue to improve. Already there is a school run by both Protestants and Catholics, which clearly indicates to me that the countries unfairness is disappearing with the help of those who are open-minded.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work