• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What does the social welfare legislation pass between 1906 and 1911 reveal about the intentions of Lloyd George and the Liberal government?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What does the social welfare legislation pass between 1906 and 1911 reveal about the intentions of Lloyd George and the Liberal government? The social welfare legislation passed by Lloyd George between 1906 and 1911 reveals a lot of his intentions but also asks questions of what he was really intending. It could be argued that the party had good intentions, to help people who needed it the most. However it could be argued that it was only for personal and political gain for both Lloyd George and the Liberals. Firstly it can be argued that the Liberal government introduced reforms because they felt the need to help people who needed it the most. There was widespread poverty in Britain at the time and little help from government to change this. It was highlighted by the findings of Boothe and Rowntree which cause great humanitarian concern. The reforms were aimed to help all of the population. The Education act and Children's act aimed to keep children health and safe therefore improving their lives and helping their education. ...read more.

Middle

For example, the first education act introduced provided medical inspections for children however it did not provide any way of treating the problems that were found, therefore many were left untreated. The Old Age Pension act was supposed to help those who were no longer able to work, however this also had a major problem, there were too many conditions which meant many who needed it were not eligible. The other schemes also had different limits, The National Insurance act for example was through contribution. This meant that the poor were having to provide much of there own reforms and showed a lack of investment from the government. Others were only through local authorities and were not compulsory, this indicates that although the Liberals wanted it to seem like they intended to help and did introduce some good legislation, they were not prepared to spend too much to help. This may mean that the legislation was for personal gain to the image of the party rather than helping the population. ...read more.

Conclusion

The Liberals also achieved more gain from the publicity boost that they got from seeming like a party dedicated to welfare. They needed it to survive the increasing support that Labour was getting from the public. From this I can see that the Liberal Government claimed that its intention was to help workers and the poor by providing them with welfare. However it can be argued that the other gains that the Liberals achieved from it were not by accident but rather planned and were ultimately there intentions. The question asks what the intentions of Lloyd George and the Liberal government were; in my opinion the two had different intentions. Many of the proposals were fiercely opposed by some members of the cabinet and Lloyd George and Churchill were the only 'New Liberals'. In my opinion they were the only members who really intended on helping those who needed it. I believe many other Liberals had different intentions and only went along with the reforms because they saw that other advantages could be gained from them. ?? ?? ?? ?? Chris Webb 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Britain 1905-1951 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Here's what a teacher thought of this essay

5 star(s)

The author has produced a strong essay which shows not only excellent knowledge, through a detailed explanation of the reforms, but also the ability to consider both sides of the argument and reach an informed judgement. 5 out of 5 stars.

Marked by teacher Natalya Luck 05/10/2012

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Britain 1905-1951 essays

  1. Marked by a teacher

    To what extend do you agree with Rhodes view that the British Empire was ...

    5 star(s)

    Due to the empire Britain gained more land, more soldiers and more allies to help vend itself off against invading countries, for example Gibraltar was a perfect site for a navel base because from the bottle neck it formed with the tip of Africa to create a unique guarding spot to defend the entrance of the Mediterranean.

  2. Marked by a teacher

    What Were the Consequences of the First World War for the British People 1914 ...

    4 star(s)

    (The skilled workers went into jobs that really only required genuine skill). So this and the `leaving certificate' helped redeem the post-war situation slightly in that if lots of skilled workers died in the war, the unskilled/semi-skilled could fill their boots.

  1. Why did women fail to gain the vote between 1900-1914?

    These reforms aimed to help the poorer people in England. The Liberals probably thought that they had made such an effort with their welfare reforms, yet the bothersome suffragettes were demanding the vote. There were also constitutional problems concerning the Lords, the Irish Home Rule Bill and the People's Budget 1909.

  2. Why did World War One break out in 1914?

    The Black Hand terrorist group from Serbia considered the Duke as a threat because they wanted independence from Austria-Hungary.

  1. Evacuation in Britain during the Second World War

    The fact that this is government propaganda makes it more likely to be true in this case, as there must have been a big problem for the government to admit to it. However this shows that evacuation was successful because many of these problems were solved due to evacuation.

  2. Why were British Civilians affected by World War 2?

    end of the war until midnight on 4 July 1954, when restrictions on the sale and purchase of meat and bacon were lifted. The government used propaganda and enforced clothing and food rationing to try to support the economy. By 1943 over a million tons of vegetables were being grown in civilian's gardens and allotments.

  1. Explain the importance of the battle of Britain as a turning point of the ...

    Operation Overlord was a massive turning point in World War Two, it was the first real attack that was organised by the two main Western Allies (England and America), it applied a lot of pressure on Hitler in a short time which Stalingrad didn't do ( Stalingrad applied pressure more

  2. How much did the CID improve investigative policing in the years 1880-1950?

    Along with technology, communication was also a crucial part of detection. Communication between the CID and the police was vital. Without communication between the two forces, no improvement in detection could be made. A key example of this was during Jack the Ripper murders.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work