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What was Framlingham Castle like in 1215?

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Introduction

Framlingham Coursework What was Framlingham Castle like in 1215? At site B, there is a large window on the second floor, facing east. This is evidence that the building was used for religious purposes. You can also see sloped grooves in the wall for roof lashings, however there are also corbels on the wall, above the base of these grooves. The grooves are bonded into the wall so it would seem that they were built with the original castle, also the corbels are made of sandstone and carved for decoration, which suggests they were built at a later date. The source booklet also shows the chapel and hall being positioned here so this leaves little doubt that that this is the chapel's site. The sources also state that the first hall is next to the chapel. There are large windows in this area with seats in them and a great fireplace on the first floor, this suggests that the hall was here. It appears that the kitchen was underneath as there is a series of small fireplaces, probably ovens and holes in the wall that could be used for storage. At the main gateway there is evidence of a drawbridge being here as there is a gap in the original stone areas of the bridge. ...read more.

Middle

The source booklet doesn't say much about the gateway but the physical evidence proves most of the points. Page nine in the source booklet does mention that a typical Tudor style was to have "fake" crenellations or turrets on the house. This gateway follows that fashion and was for decoration and not defence. At site D there are two large brick objects on the floor, these are the remains of huge Howard fireplaces and suggest that a kitchen was here. On the first floor there is a private garderobe, this could have been for private accommodation. There is also a large, double garderobe between the two fireplaces on the first floor, this could have been for the staff. The source book shows an earlier kitchen here, the Howard one may have been built on its foundations or even in the same building. At site E there is a newer building but it is symmetrical like most Tudor houses, so this may have been a modernisation of it. This is also next to the kitchen so it would seem it was a house. Page eleven of the source booklet also states that the new building was built on the foundations of the Tudor house. At site A however, there is a doorway with a red brick frame, beam holes made from red brick and a brick fireplace, this is evidence that the Howard house extended around to here as well. ...read more.

Conclusion

Fighting on these stairs would be hard unless you were left handed. A normal rich Tudor house would be made of either red brick or black wood and plaster. You could also expect many chimneys, used for decoration and for the many fireplaces and lots of glass to show off the owner's money. England went through a cold period during the Tudor times, this forced people to abandon their large extravagant halls and make smaller rooms with fireplaces to stay warm in this new environment. Glass also helped to keep the heat in, this was costly however and also showed off how rich the owner was. Framlingham is an unusual setting for a Tudor house, as most people would have knocked down the walls or built the house outside of the walls or somewhere else. The Howard's may have built it inside the walls to make it seen from far away, or because it was a good setting. The actual house was what you could expect of a Tudor house however. In all Framlingham Castle has never been a typical castle or luxury Tudor home. However the Bigod castle was closer to the norm than the Howard house. It wasn't completely normal, the walls, the prison tower and the shape of the towers are all strange, but it follows the basic pattern of the time. The Howard house was completely different to what you could expect at that time when seen from a distance. ...read more.

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