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What was life like in the trenches during WW1?

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Introduction

Trench Life - Diary Entry Dear Diary, today we went up into the front-line near Arras, through sodden and devastated countryside. As we were moving up to the our sector along the communication trenches, a shell burst ahead of me and one of my platoon dropped dead, Matthew, he was my best friend. Both his legs were blown off and the whole of his face and body was peppered with shrapnel. The sight turned my stomach. I was sick and terrified, but even more frightened of showing it. I do not understand why he stood up and started to run towards the enemy front line. I had been talking to the same man the night before; he was wondering if his family would survive if he died out here in Arras. ...read more.

Middle

He could not feel his feet the poor man and they were swollen to around double the normal size. They were all kinds of colour and looked like they had fungus growing on them. It was a horrible sight. He told me, that he had been putting lots of grease on his feet and had been changing his socks a lot but there is no cure for this disease and it generally results in amputation. If he got back, he could let his family bear this burden. They say you are never the same once you have experienced trench foot. Last night I had been asleep in that dugout for about three hours when I woke up and felt something biting my hip. ...read more.

Conclusion

Everyone in my platoon is scared now and is double checking everything just to be safe. The cooks rely on vegetables and other food sources from the surroundings; they can't take everything with them when they move from place to place. Tonight, hopefully I will get a nice meal, corned beef would be ideal but you do not get that too often around here, it is normally pea or nettle soup or some other rubbish that the cooks can prepare. Most of us are optimists around camp, we like to have very high expectations and we think that everything is going to be alright. Mind you, we can't really be pessimistic because it doesn't get much worse than this around here. It has to get better tomorrow. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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