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What was the impact of the British army moving into Northern Ireland?

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Introduction

History question 1b Max Carter 11EB What was the impact of the British army moving into Northern Ireland? In 1969, the protestant unionist government lost control of recent events in Ireland. The Catholics were unable to trust the police or anyone for that matter as everyone around them was Protestant. Civil riots also took place, which caused the already bad situations to get even worse. It became so bad that eventually they barricaded themselves into a small area known as Bogside. After several violent marches which frequently sparked off riots including that of the Orange marches but more importantly the Apprentice Boys Parade, which was held to commemorate the remind the Catholics of the successful protestant siege of Londonderry. So after the violent riots and the fact that the Catholics were barricaded into Bogside, it was time for the British Army to move in. In this answer I will look further into the why the British were sent in and a number of other factors as well. Firstly, NICRA (Northern Ireland Civil Rights Activists) were a group of people who thought that there was too much discrimination between the Protestants and Catholics. From facts like these you might be able to see why: ? The police force was 6/7 protestant. ? Hartland and Wolff shipyards (who built the Titanic) employed 10,000 workers, and only 400 of those were Catholic Nationalists. ? Finally the Ulster Unionist party who were all Protestants dominated politics. ...read more.

Middle

The government spent �2,000,000 creating new jobs for the public and started to try to find an end to all the discrimination between the two communities. Other reforms which weren't so successful were also planned but failed and didn't even take off. The reason for this is that they were two slow and by the time they were getting looked at, the Nationalist Catholics were fed up and frustrated. Following these failed reforms and the Hunt Report, opinions on the British Army by the Catholics had changed and now the good first thoughts had become bad, this led to PIRA becoming popular. The Hunt Report, which I briefly mentioned above, was a report on the causes of the recent violence. It was a special investigation set up by the 'Hunt Commission' who was government owned. On October 10th the report made already awkward matters a lot worse by recommending that the RUC (Royal Irish Constabulary) should be disbanded and replaced by a new police force with Catholics as well as Protestants as the RUC was predominately Protestants. Also that the B-Specials who were a part timed, armed, volunteer police force should be scrapped and instead have the Ulster Defence Regiment who were a part time army regiment. However the worst part of the 'Hunt Report' was not any of the recommended changes but the fact that it was released on a Friday night, which was drinking night in Ireland. ...read more.

Conclusion

Following this policy, the army raided homes and 342 suspects 'listed' by the RUC special branch were arrested and imprisoned without trial. Only two of these were 342 were Protestant, which further shows the discrimination that was around at the time. 226 of the suspects were imprisoned in long H-Blocks at the Long Kesh Internment Camp and lots of the inmates were regularly physically beaten and the British Government was accused of breaking Article 17 on the Geneva Convention. There was just 30 deaths before Internment however after there was getting on for 150. This just shows me how violent and not forgiving the Internment Camp workers could be. However towards the end of the year, violence has started to die down a bit following the discovery of new weapons and ammunitions. Catholic support for PIRA was still ongoing and soaring. Sinn Fein campaigned for against Internment and warnings were issued to tourists saying: "Stay Out, Internment is now on!" After too many people failed to like Internment, it all collapsed and the British swiftly left Ireland. In conclusion I believe that the deployment of British troops into Ireland to sort out problems actually made things a lot worse from the current situation. It added a lot of tension between the sides and at the end of the campaign; the British were hated by both of them - Catholic and Protestant. Another impact of the deployment of the British army was that the PROVOs increased popularity because the CS that was used by the British created a feeling of togetherness between citizens. ...read more.

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