• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

"What was the purpose of the Final Solution?"

Extracts from this document...


History Coursework 1. What was the purpose of the "Final Solution"? The purpose of the final solution was to solve what Hitler and the Nazis termed the "Jewish Problem." The adjective "final" in this context has two meanings, one - it was the final step in a series of failed measures to get rid of the Jews, and two - it would be permanent. Hitler and the Nazis were extremely Anti-Semitic and hated the Jews intensely. They were obsessed with the "Jewish Problem" and had various ideas about how to solve the "Jewish Problem". So what did the Nazis try and do to the Jews? After Hitler became Chancellor (30th January 1933) the Nazis initially tried to force the Jews to emigrate from Germany. The Nazis did not plan to murder 6 million Jews. By the time World War Two started 80% of the Jews in Germany had emigrated - only around 80,000 were left. They now had nearly solved the "Jewish Problem". On the 1st September 1939 the Germans invaded Poland and in two weeks controlled half of it. They now had 2 million more Jews under their control - a much bigger "problem" than before. The Nazis then came up with a temporary solution - to concentrate all the Jewish Poles into Ghettoes. In June 1941 the Nazis invaded Russia and millions more Jews came under Nazi control. ...read more.


These laws defined a Jew; however they were muddled and illogical. A Jew was defined as someone who had one or more Jewish parents, two or more Jewish grandparents, or who engaged in Jewish religious practices. It was also possible to be classed as a Jew through marriage to a Jew or to someone with 3 or more Jewish grandparents. However, this was eventually dropped due to public pressure. The first Nuremburg Law defined Reich citizenship as being only able to be held by a "national of German or kindred blood", a definition the Jews were excluded from. Jews no longer held the right to vote or a fair trial. The second major Nuremburg Law, "For the Protection of German Blood and German Honour", banned marriage and sexual relations between Jews and Germans. There was no clear definition of a Jew either in genetic or religious terms, but Jews were officially made second class citizens by these laws in Nazi Germany. The Growth of Radical Anti-Semitism Open persecution of the Jews began to become more widespread in Nazi Germany between 1937 and 1939, as Jews were driven out of certain towns, which then declared themselves to be Judenfrei "Jew free" or Judenrein "Jew Pure". The Jews were banned from public swimming pools, restaurants, sports grounds, caf�s and theatres. However the ostracizing of Jews from German society did not provoke public anger or even disapproval. ...read more.


Conclusion The Final Solution, genocide of the European Jewry, was the last in a series of stages; encouraging emigration, ghettoes, shooting and finally the gas chambers. This was meant to be permanent. At first Hitler and the Nazis had been content with forcing Jews to leave Germany. They had not yet conceived the idea of murdering all the Jews. By 1939, 80% of the Jews had emigrated. On the outbreak of war on the 1st September 1939 and the capture of Poland, 2 million more Jews came under Nazi control. the possibilities for solving this "problem" considered were numerous. One of Hitler's ideas was to deport the Jews to Madagascar, and to use them as slave labour, before the Nazis decided on genocide. By the summer of 1941 a decision had been taken at Auschwitz to kill the Jews who could not work and to work the ones who could until they died. During Operation Barbarossa in 1941, the Einzattgruppen came behind the front lines and murdered Jews by shooting them. Finally the final solution was systematically organized at the Wansee Conference in 1942. So the purpose of the final solution was solve what the Nazis termed the "Jewish Problem" by genocide of the Jews - killing those who could not work straight away and then working the others to death as slaves. The end result was that by the end of the Second World War 6 million Jews had been killed. ?? ?? ?? ?? Gr�inne Baker ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. Describe how Jews were discriminated against in Germany from 1933 to 1939

    People who had escaped from the concentration camps such as Auschwitz gave accounts of the systematic extermination. However, many Allied military leaders did not act upon rescuing the prisoners in these camps, as they did not believe these accounts were true since they were so horrendous.

  2. Why was the decision to carry out the final solution made in 1941?

    In their opinion, the idea of systematic mass murder evolved only gradually, the result of the failure of Nazi leaders to find a less brutal way to control the threat to humanity they believed the Jews posed. Often they have presented mass killings as the product of a process of

  1. How and why were the Nazis able to carry out "the Final Solution to ...

    They had any gold teeth taken out which could be melted and converted to gold. They were all stripped naked and some were even given a piece of rock, which had a soapy covering so they genuinely thought they were going for a shower.

  2. What was the purpose of the final solution?

    Source one, demonstrates that through the dictatorship regime carried out by the Nazis, workers were given orders to not only exterminate non-Aryans but to "Keep quiet about this or face the death penalty". Despite such threats this source demonstrates that there were in fact normal workers within camps who witnessed the brutality carried out.

  1. Describe how Jews were persecuted in the twentieth century before the Holocaust.

    Noah's covenant with God. This was made just after God destroyed the world (when it rained for forty days and forty nights). God promised never again to destroy the world. In return, Noah promised to keep the 'Noachide Laws'. They were like the 10 commandments (although they came after this covenant), but included not being cruel to animals, and promoting justice.

  2. The Final Solution - Sources Questions

    Overall I think this source is reliable because Hans Scholl had first hand knowledge of the situation at the time. However it is fair to say, because the source comes from an anti-Nazi group, that this source is slightl;y biased as shown by the language used.

  1. How much did the German People know about the final solution?

    The Sources that I believe are unreliable are sources 5 and 7. Both Sources 5 and 7 use inference when written. I believe this as a history source to be highly unreliable as it is only somebody's opinion on the facts that they have been provided.

  2. The Final Solution

    Nearly 10000 Jewish shops had their windows smashed and goods looted by the S.S. Jewish homes and synagogues were burnt and dozens of Jews killed and thousands arrested. The Jews were then fined 1 billion marks. By 1939, the Nazi leaders had decided they would clear Germany of all Jews, by the 'Final Solution'.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work