• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

What were ghettoes and why were they established by the Nazis?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

What were ghettoes and why were they established by the Nazis? The ghettoes were exclusively Jewish districts which the Nazis established, which were walled off from the rest of the city. They were situated in the poorest districts in the larger cities of Poland, including Warsaw. The Jews were concentrated in these areas and, due to overcrowding, lived in squalid, terrible conditions. Many Jews thought that their lives could not possibly get worse than this. However, Heydrich, deputy leader of the S.S., described the ghettoes at the Wannsee conference as merely a "prerequisite stage" towards the "ultimate aim". However, he never made clear what exactly was meant by the "ultimate aim". Source C is an extract from Martin Gilbert's book Final Journey: the Fate of the Jews in Nazi Europe (1979). It quotes the edict from the Nazis for the creation of the ghettoes; that all Jews living outside the walls must move in and all Poles living inside the ghetto must leave it. ...read more.

Middle

It is a video clip from a history documentary called "Hitler the Criminal" shown on the Discovery Channel. It includes original film footage taken inside the Warsaw ghetto in 1941. It shows walls of about 6 metres or 20 feet, with German guards at one of the gates. Janina David, a survivor of the Warsaw ghetto, was interviewed about life in the Warsaw ghetto - she described it as "like living in a trap." Conditions in the ghetto were horrendous. Where 40,000 poor Polish Catholics had lived, 500,000 Jews were moved into. The result was huge overcrowding. Source A tells us that the Nazis allocated 184 calories per Jew per day. In the original footage we can see an emaciated body lying on the side of the road, skeletal corpses being lifted onto a cart, and starving children standing on a footpath. ...read more.

Conclusion

The ghettoes were never intended to be the final Solution to the Jewish Problem. Heydrich told the conference held in Berlin that the ghettoes were only a "prerequisite stage" towards the "planned overall measures" - a euphemism for the permanent solution to the "Jewish Problem". Hitler himself said, "We can only do what is feasible," meaning that the ghettoes were "a stage" towards something much worse. Hitler did not say what his aim was, and he did not decided on the Final Solution until the second half of 1941. Ghettoes were established to bring the Jews under the Nazis' control in the short term. This was only a temporary solution until permanent one was decided in the long term. It was a necessary stage for the "ultimate aim" - to solve the "Jewish Problem" permanently. By having the Jews "concentrated" in a small number of places they would be available for any "solution" the Nazis should decide on. Ghettoes would facilitate the final solution. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Germany 1918-1939 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Germany 1918-1939 essays

  1. Life under the Nazis - who was better and worse off.

    Hitler encouraged people who didn't like the Church to join the German Faith Movement, based on the worship of the sun. Few bishops or churchgoers opposed the Nazis seriously, so the Nazis didn't mind. It was foolish to support the Church and challenge the Nazis openly, as some people, mostly murdered by the SS.

  2. Creative piece- diary from the Warsaw Ghetto.

    Some people are selling goods on the black market and are able to live very well. The Nazis are organising some food to be given to us every day. Mother has to wait for 7 hours in a queue for cup full of soup to feed five of us.

  1. The Tin Drum (1979)

    Images like this in the film show how the public perceived Hitler as godlike and how politics was replacing culture and intellect. However at the end of the film when Hitler is defeated Alfred crumples up the picture of Hitler and Beethoven is put back on the walls showing how

  2. The Warsaw Ghetto.

    or by a Nazi regarding what was occurring there for his superiors. However, we do know that the programme in which the film footage was included was anti-Nazi. On the other hand, we do not know if all of the footage was actually shot in the Warsaw ghetto, and whoever

  1. According to sources A, B and C, What were ghettos and why were they ...

    conditions inside the Warsaw ghetto, with extreme cases of malnutrition and starvation being highlighted. The aspect of overcrowding was also very well shown in the video. A survivor from these hard times gives us a brief interview of what it was like living in the ghetto," we were caught in a trap.

  2. The Warsaw Ghetto.

    the crowded streets; as the Jewish people tried, against all the odds to survive in what must have been, a living hell. Before a single person was transferred to Auschwitz, tens of thousands of innocent people died a death, which is summed up best in the words of a 'Warsaw

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work