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What were the problems of the Weimar Republic and why did it collapse?

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Introduction

What were the problems of the Weimar Republic and why did it collapse? When the Republic was first set up, the members if the Reichstag were elected by the system of proportional representation. This posed the Wiemar Republic's first problem. Because of the voting system used, the party that was in government didn't have a majority over the opposition parties. This meant that it was very hard to get laws passed and led to a inefficient and ineffective government, just when Germany needed a government which was strong and central to support it. The treaty of Versailles left Germany angry and discontented on top of the humiliation of defeat. Many Germans blamed President Ebert for accepting the harsh terms of the treaty. As well as hurting the pride of the German people, the treaty of Versailles crippled German economy. They lost land, relied on because it was rich in natural resources, greatly lessening Germany's industrial output and chance of paying the heavy �6.6 billion they had to pay in reparations under the terms of the treaty. ...read more.

Middle

A long-term cause of the economic problems in Weimar Germany was the rising wages and rising prices, which had been going on since the war. Passive Resistance undermined the rapidly decreasing currency and by October 1923, the Deutsch Mark was worthless. It was this, which finally made Chancellor Stresemann reject the policy of Passive Resistance. The problem of hyperinflation was solved by the time the Republic collapsed, with a new unit of currency and the help of the Dawes Plan, but it was still and important factor in its failure. The inflation crisis was another sign of the weakness of the government. After the Kaiser had abdicated in November 1918, and before the Weimar Republic was set up, armed communists had led a revolt against the new Socialist government. They were only repressed with the help of the Freikorps. It was memories of this and what was happening Russia that led many German people to fear Communism and prejudice themselves against them. ...read more.

Conclusion

It was now that Hitler, out of prison and after having reformed the Nazi party promised the people exactly what they needed; a strong government and a cure to unemployment. This was a sign that the Weimar Republic was rapidly loosing control. In the election in July 1932, the Nazis gained more votes in the Reichstag than the next two biggest parties put together. Despite this it took another election in November 1932, to convince President Hindenburg to appoint Hitler chancellor. He had little choice in the end and Hitler became chancellor on 30th January 1933. This was the last stray for the Weimar Republic. As soon a Hitler was in control, he set about turning Germany into a one party state. This signed the end of the Weimar Republic. It was partly the government's fault that the Weimar Republic failed, as an inefficient government can't rule well. Hitler was the trigger that sparked the end but it was the economic crises caused by the Wall Street Crash that allowed him to gain power legally. All these factors united to b ring about the collapse of the Weimar Republic. ...read more.

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