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Which was the most important cause of the First World War? The Moroccan Crisis 1905-1911 The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand at Sarajevo in Bosnia in 1914?

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Introduction

Which was the most important cause of the First World War? * The Moroccan Crisis 1905-1911 * The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand at Sarajevo in Bosnia in 1914? The definition of a World War is "a war enraged by all or most of the principal nations in the world." The so-called 'Great War' was a unique war because such a thing had never happened before. There were many causes of the First World War amongst witch were The First and Second Moroccan Crisis and The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. The most obvious cause of The First World War was The assassination of The Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie in Sarajevo 28th June 1914, also known as the 'Balkan Crisis'. ...read more.

Middle

Austria presented Serbia with a 10 point ultimatum which Serbia could not accept, therefore Austria finally got what they wanted and declared war on 28th July 1914, this was known as the 'spark' of the world war but there were also more complex causes of the war. The First and Second Moroccan Crisis' raised the tension in Europe in both 1905 and 1911. France wanted to take control of Morocco in Northern Africa, but Germany also wanted to colonise and be seen as 'important' and 'powerful'. So Kaiser Wilhelm gave a speech on how he wanted independence for Morocco, the French were absolutely enraged by Germanys interference, there was a conference held in 1906 in which the Kaiser was left humiliated, embarrassed and also very aware of the close relationship between France and Britain. ...read more.

Conclusion

There was another conference, in which Germany was compensated with a strip of land in central Africa which was unwanted, this would of made the German Kaiser feel humiliated, and would of left him bitter. After this the France and Britain decided that the French would patrol the Mediterranean whilst Britain's Royal Navy looked after France's north and south Atlantic coasts. It is therefore reasonable to say that although the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand 'sparked' the war, The Moroccan Crisis however made this World War inevitable because it started the alliances, and without these alliances there may still of been a war, but it wouldn't have been a World War as it would not have got all of the main powers involved, also The Moroccan Crisis left Germany bitter, and left out of France and Britain's close relationship. ...read more.

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