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Who was sir Christopher Wren?

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Introduction

Who was Sir Christopher Wren and what did he do? Sir Christopher Wren was born on the 20 October 1632, and died on the 25 February 1723.He was a 17th century English designer, a brilliant astronomer, mathematician, and the greatest English architect at this point in time. Wren designed 53 churches in London, including St Paul's Cathedral. He was a founder of the Royal Society and president from 1680-82, his scientific work was highly regarded by Sir Isaac Newton. ...read more.

Middle

He had to compromise and the final building is still dominated by the magnificent dome which is placed over the crossing area of the cross. The curve of the walls was gone, and is replaced by clearstory windows to provide light for the nave and choir. These windows are hidden by behind high screen walls. The material used in the building was the brilliant white Portland stone. Christopher Wren designed and built the Royal Hospital--> in Chelsea (1682-1754). ...read more.

Conclusion

He was helped in his work by younger assistants, especially Nicholas Hawksmere. Wren was also very productive with other commissions. He had a large input into the design of Hampton Court and the Naval Hospital at Greenwich. These have a Dutch influence of Royalty with a mixture of stone and red brick. He was a very adaptable architect and had a great appreciation of the older Gothic designs and could design buildings in harmony with these, e.g. Tom Tower at Christchurch. He also designed very up-to-date buildings, such as Trinity College Library in Cambridge. This was built on designs of Paris architecture at the time. ?? ?? ?? ?? ...read more.

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