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Why did British troops enter northern Ireland in 1969

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Introduction

Why did British troops enter northern Ireland in 1969 ? Ever since the colonization of Ireland in the 16th century ,under the reign of Queen Elizabeth 1 ; Catholics have suffered a continuous flow of discrimination and abuse from the protestant community . Over the years , the protestants grew steadily more wealthy and the catholic became rapidly poorer. Years passed along with little violence until conflict erupted when the Irish weren't given home rule . This eventually lead to protests such as the Easter Rising in 1916 which was carried out by protesting catholic nationalists . This gradual growth of conflict led to the partition of Ireland in 1921 . For 35 years , the protestants continued to discriminate against the catholics in relatively obvious ways . However , in 1956, the protestant discrimination of the catholics became subtle and was often used to keep protestants powerful and wealthy .For example , the gerrymandering of the political system ensured that the protestants were kept in powerful parliamentary positions . This lead to almost 2500 people being disenfranchised . Another example was that of employment . During 1959 , there was lot of unemployment in northern Ireland and so the council decided that employment would become a protestant privilege . ...read more.

Middle

These groups used non violent direct action to achieve their goals and provoke a reaction from the protestants .For example , catholics squatted in protestant council houses . These groups wanted to give the catholics rights and have a change in the political system .In time , these civil rights groups became socialist and decided to help all disadvantaged groups in society . And , in August 1968, the first civil rights march took place . The newly created civil rights groups caused the outrage in the protestant community and further lead to the unionist backlash in 1968/9 .The protestants became angry and fought back against the civil rights groups . On 5th October 1968, the civil rights march took place in Derry .The protestants , however, announced that they would be marching on the same day . The government, realising that there could be trouble , banned both marches form taking place. This gesture was overlooked and both groups marched anyway .This led to violence , conflicts and riots. By then , the government realised that they were losing control of the situation in Ireland and called out the RUC and the special B's to calm the situation down . ...read more.

Conclusion

This act led to the occurrence of the Battle of the Bogside . The mass media got full coverage of this battle and sent the pictures to Britain and the rest of the EU. Upon seeing the situation in northern Ireland , the prime minister of Eire made a plea to the British government and , on 14th August 1969 , British troops entered Northern Ireland . They are still there to this day . In conclusion ,troops entered northern Ireland in 1969 because of 3 main reasons : protestant fears , discrimination and rising violence in the community . I think that the most important cause is the discrimination because without it , the catholics would have had no reason to be so angry with the protestants .The second most important cause is , I believe , the success of the civil rights groups in America as they inspired the catholics to stand up against the protestants . The third and last important cause is , in my opinion , the protestant fears as they fuelled the discrimination of the catholics .If the protestants weren't so paranoid about what would happen if Ireland was reunited , they would have had no reason to discriminate against the catholics . ?? ?? ?? ?? Lisa Casemore ...read more.

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