• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why did the British government decide to evacuate children from Britain(TM)s major cities in the early years of the Second World

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why did the British government decide to evacuate children from Britain's major cities in the early years of the Second World War? Before the war in 1939 the British government evacuated 11/2 million children, mothers and teachers, pregnant women and some disabled from the cities and big towns due to the fear of air raids. School children were mainly evacuated to smaller towns and villages in the country as it was a safer area to be in. However it didn't all go smoothly as Hitler didn't bomb as expected for around 9 months many mothers decided to bring their children home and because of this had to be re evacuated which the government had to then persuade them. I'd say that a long-term reason for the evacuations was the panic that the Germans caused when they bombed Britain back in WW1. ...read more.

Middle

The British government therefore wanted to defend against air raids, so they started handing out free gas masks in case of gas attack as gas is what really scared the British. They also started to sell bomb shelters and water hoses to the public to use in an emergency such as an air raid. They also used propaganda to help keep morale up. They started to practise air raid drills and build of massive air raid shelters for the public to use when they where not at home. Artillery stations were positioned around cities to shoot down enemy aircraft. They became very useful and was the best defence we had over our cities. However the government still believed that evacuation was going to be the best option. The government used a lot of propaganda throughout the war which had a great impact on the British people. ...read more.

Conclusion

Hitler's main aim was to break British morale, which is a key point in winning the war however this didn't work due to the strength of the British public and the propaganda used by the government to keep Britain's spirits up. If a lot of children had been killed it would have been so much more difficult. I believe that evacuations were the best possible answers to many of the wartime problems which is why the government arranged it. Not only saving Thousands of lives but it also kept up morale which was needed as death would change peoples state of mind causing them to not function correctly. Another reason that I believe in is that the British public didn't lose faith in the war effort and Government as less people were dying. However I have some suspicion that they may have done this so that the children would grow up and it would save a whole generation of people and that it would enable women to work. ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE Britain 1905-1951 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE Britain 1905-1951 essays

  1. Evacuation in Britain during the Second World War

    the walls" (Source E), "hair crawling with lice, and bed-wetting" (Source A). Even the government admitted that there could be problems with evacuees. In Source D, a government propaganda photograph of evacuees in the bath, which confirms the belief that many evacuees were very dirty.

  2. Discuss the impact of the Second World War on Britain.

    prices to avoid inflation, and wages doubled by the end of the war. Bevin, a Labour minister, directed workers where they needed and the workers were reasonably happy. The Second World War had an enormous social impact on Britain and the British people.

  1. Why did the British Government decide to evacuate children from Britain(TM)s major cities in ...

    One person said 'The whole street seemed to explode.' And 'worst of all were the screams of the wounded and dying' when describing an air raid on Folkestone in May 1917. The government took measures to protect its citizens from future attacks. The east coast was guarded and defences were introduced against air attacks.

  2. WW2 Evacuations

    It says "many evacuees could not settle" if this quote is true it is a small price to pay for saving the lives of many children. It was also the opposite in many cases some children settled in and their lives where greatly improved, for example Michael Caine who refers

  1. Evacuation Of British School Children In World War 2.

    In my opinion this source would be quite reliable as evidence about evacuees. Although it is from a fictional novel, to make it more realistic it must have had a basis of fact. Its reliability is increased by the fact that Nina Bowden (the author)

  2. What was the extent of change in the role of the UK government in ...

    It proposed a scheme of benefit designed to guarantee health care and education for all. The reports main aim was achieve society where each man had the basic necessities to support him and his family. The Beveridge report shows the extent of change in that the government was taking a

  1. Why did the British Government decide to evacuate children from Britains major cities in ...

    When the tanks had arrived, the bombers would leave, making sure there was not enough time for the city to organise itself. Any damaged roads were repaired for German use and then the bombers and tanks would move to the next city quickly.

  2. Why did the British government decide to evacuate children from Britains major cities in ...

    It wasn't uncommon to find a child left waiting in a reception centre with a name tag, all alone. The sheer scale of the process meant that people were sometimes forgotten. The government had to be completely committed to the process in order to pull it off.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work