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Why did the British government decide to evacuate children from Britain's major cities at the start of the Second World War?

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Introduction

Why did the British government decide to evacuate children from Britain's major cities at the start of the Second World War? Introduction There was five reasons in total why the British government decided to evacuate children at the start of the second world war, they were the fear of huge civilian casualties, major development in technology, rationing, women were able to do war work in the factories, and control. The most important one to me was the fear of huge civilian casualties. The government felt they had to evacuate the children from the major cities to the countryside because they feared being bombed. This wasn't the first case where the government feared huge civilian deaths, there were threats from Zeppelins in 1922 and there were predictions of 4,000,000 civilian casualties. ...read more.

Middle

New equipment and more effective weapons made a big difference to how people reacted to war, they obviously had developed more dangerous weapons and the more effective the weapon the more deaths. The evacuation of the children at the start of the Second World War was successful in so far as they did evacuate masses of children and some adults from towns to countryside but after the successful German attack on Poland (Poland surrendered) in September 1939, little progress was made in this war and became known as the "Phoney war". Some mothers brought their children back as they thought there wasn't really a war, but by May an attack on France urged mother for a second evacuation. This links in with the rationing and women at work. ...read more.

Conclusion

The last reason for evacuation was control. The government controlled everything, they controlled when the evacuation should take place how and where to, they issued a leaflet titled "evacuation-why and how?" this was all part of propaganda. The government also evacuated children from the towns to the countryside so they would seem caring to the civilians, and gain their trust to keep the war effort going. They said that if they evacuated children from Britain overseas to different countries that there would be fewer mouths to feed in Britain. I conclude that the British government decided to evacuate children from major cities at the start of the Second World War because of the huge civilian casualties; personally I feel they all played a part in evacuation but this was the most important although each reason could be argued to be the most important reason. Leanne Allen Leanne Allen ...read more.

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