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Why did the British Government decide to evacuate children from Britain's major cities in the early years of the Second World War?

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Introduction

Why did the British Government decide to evacuate children from Britain's major cities in the early years of the Second World War? On the 1st September 1939; two days before the declaration of war, the British Government officially started to evacuate civilians from Britain's major cities. It was mainly children who were evacuated, but others such as the disabled and blind, teachers, mothers and young children and also pregnant women were also sent away. From the 1st - 3rd September around 1.5 million people were evacuated. Evacuation statistics: * 827,000 Children * 524,000 Mothers and young children * 103,000 Teachers * 13,000 Pregnant women * 7,0000 Disabled and Blind The evacuees were sent to rural towns and villages in designated areas where the Government thought that they would not be in danger. ...read more.

Middle

The children were taken in by people for many reasons, sometimes the people living in the countryside just wanted to help and sometimes they felt that they had a sense of duty. Other times they were taken in because of the money they got from the government and sometimes because of the work they could get them to do. These varying reasons for the children being taken in contributed to how the children found their ordeal. Some children returned enjoyed their time away from home and returned after the war had finished, whilst others hated it and tried to run back home. Up until July 1940 there were no attacks on Britain, resulting in lots of the evacuees being bought back to the cities by their parents. ...read more.

Conclusion

This was especially important because they were the only people who could do all of these jobs as most of the men were fighting in the war. Fathers also experienced worry and did not want to leave their families unless they were evacuated. The final reason for the children being evacuated was to help the farmers in the country. Some of the children wanted to help with the war and decided to go into the country to help the farmers who grew most of the food for the country. There was a food shortage in Britain as most of the farmers were fighting in the war so the public were encouraged to grow their own food. The farmers used the evacuated children to plants seeds for crops, pick the produce and also water them. In conclusion I think the children were evacuated to stop the worry that surrounded them from being in the cities. ...read more.

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