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Why did the British government decide to evacuate children from major cities in the Second World War

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Introduction

Why did the British government decide to evacuate children from major cities in the Second World War? During the first few months of the war evacuation was voluntary and introduced to try and save the lives of children and the vulnerable. The British government evacuated children from the major cities and ports because they were potential air raid targets for German bombers. Almost 3.5 million people were moved to try and keep casualties down by the end of the war most of them were children. The British government evacuated children from major cities because they were at risk of bombing raids. The government expected 600,000 deaths due to bombing raids in just the first few days of the war. ...read more.

Middle

Churchill thought that it was important to keep up morale so the most vulnerable were kept safe. Total Warfare meant no one was safe so every one that was considered vulnerable were evacuated such as the elderly, pregnant women, blind, disabled and children. Many children living in big cities and towns were moved temporarily from their homes to places considered safer, usually out in the countryside. The children needed to be protected because they are the next generation that will grow up to develop and run the country it was vital to protect the future citizens of the nation. That's why they were evacuated to safer places like the country side and over seas to places like Canada, Australia the United States and South Africa. ...read more.

Conclusion

The British government made evacuation voluntary to try and stay onside with the people, if some people did not want to be evacuated then they were not forced as this would have caused people to lose faith and support in the government. The fact that the evacuation took place made the soldiers that were fathers more relaxed which caused a boost in morale. The government succeeded in protecting most of the children and evacuation overall was a success. If evacuation was not introduced then they would have been a lot more deaths and morale would have been lowered which could have changed the outcome of the war. Evacuation played a crucial role in WW2 which helped defeat Germany. The British government evacuated children from major cities and ports during World War 2 for several reasons like Military reasons and political reasons. 1 Alex Brown ...read more.

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