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Why did the British Government decide to evacuate children from most of Britain's major cities in the early years of the Second World War?

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Introduction

Nicole Ritchie History Essay Why did the British Government decide to evacuate children from most of Britain's major cities in the early years of the Second World War? The decision taken by the British Government to evacuate children during the early stages of World War Two was the result of the development of bomber aircraft from the end of World War One. This posed a major threat to Britain. The Navy had been Britain's defense system along with the English Channel. Since the discovery of bombers, fighting on the land and in the sea had become less important. The British Government planners realized that the threat from the aid was much greater and dangerous. Another reason for evacuation by the 1930's was the great disadvantage Germany had over Britain. Britain's targets were closer together than Germany's and therefore an easy reach for German bombers. ...read more.

Middle

The RAF was not a good enough defender of Britain and couldn't be relied upon so Britain had to consider evacuation as a strategy. The medium term factors were that by the 1930's Britain's air defense system was not going too well, due to cutbacks caused by the depression and Britain was at a major disadvantage with Germany. British targets were closer together than German cities and were therefore easier aims for German bombers in a future war. By 1936, it was estimated that Germany could drop 600 tons of bombs a day, which would result in masses of casualties during the first week. All of this had gone up by 1939 as Germany's air strength increased the amount and weight of bombs that could be dropped. The new amount, 700 tons was said to have been able to deliver a knock out blow. ...read more.

Conclusion

If they spent another year on improving the air force it would possibly prevent Germany from making a quick attempt at winning the war with Britain from the air. Ismay was right when the war was only won by a narrow margin two years later when the air force had more strength. This was a cause for evacuation because the air defenses were not strong enough to protect the people of Britain. It was only two years later when the defense system became 10 times stronger. In conclusion to this essay the need and cause for evacuation points to the air force. They were not strong enough to protect Britain during the early stages of war. They lacked money for new bomber planes probably because of the Wall Street crash in the earlier years. Another reason was the very populated cities this meant much easier targets for German bombers. ...read more.

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