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Why did the British Government decide to evacuate children from

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Introduction

Why did the British Government decide to evacuate children from Britain's major cities in the early years of the Second World War? The British government began to worry about another world war when Hitler came to power in 1933. They were afraid that British cities and towns would be targets for bombing raids by aircraft. The first official evacuations began on the 1st September 1939, two days before the declaration of war. There were four main reasons why the government started to evacuate; The Nuremburg rallies which showed Hitler's ability to lead and demonstrate his bellicose intent, Guernica (the Spanish civil war) which showed Hitler's ability to bomb and the newly developed tact of blitzkrieg, Zeppelins as they were used in world war one and Rearmament which showed something big was about to happen because of the increase in rearmament of Germany.. These and a few other key points, were the reasons how the British Government new to evacuate at that time. Evacuation tried to ensure the safety of young children from the cities that were considered to be in danger of Nazi bombing - London, Birmingham, Portsmouth henceforth known as evacuation areas. ...read more.

Middle

Chamberlain, above all else, feared the possibility of a southern English city being similarly bombed. Not only the Spanish civil war but Germans had also developed the tactic of blitzkrieg (lightening war) and used heavy bombing to soften up the polish. Therefore, what happened in Guernica in April 1937 was to impact what happened in Western Europe in 1938 with Britain evacuating London. When Nazi Germany openly started re-armament in 1935, few should have been surprised as Hitler had made it very clear both in his speeches and in "Mein Kampf" that he would break the "unjust" terms of the Treaty of Versailles. In 1933, Hitler ordered his army generals to prepare to treble the size of the army to 300,000 men. He ordered the Air Ministry to plan to build 1,000 war planes. Military buildings such as barracks were built. He withdrew from the Geneva Disarmament Conference when the French refused to accept his plan that the French should disarm to the level of the Germans or that the Germans should re-arm to the level of the French. Either way, the two main powers of Europe would be balanced. ...read more.

Conclusion

The whole policy of evacuation had been deigned fairly to avoid the de-sensitization of children to violence. The Germans aim was clear that they wanted to bomb the British people into giving up and to crush British morale. As the government knew how important it was to control news of the Blitz and to keep up morale. Fathers away at war could concentrate on fighting the Germans safe in knowledge that their children were out of harm's way in the countryside. This kept up morale and fighting spirit within the soldiers and armed forces. The government was quick to realize that death of children would greatly hamper the War effort. As you can see from the details above there were many reasons why the British Government decided to evacuate children, the main points being to keep up morale of fighting soldiers and to keep future generations safe. Without children being safe in World War Two, Britain would have really been at their lowest point and there would have been nothing to fight for. Evacuation was the only option for the Government at that time especially because of the preparations undertaking in Germany at that time. ?? ?? ?? ?? Natasha Cooke C/W 18.03.08 ...read more.

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