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why did the british government decide to evacuate children in the early years of the second worl war

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Introduction

Causation In August 1939 Adolf Hitler was making speeches suggesting that he was going to send Germany into Czechoslovakia. The British government began to fear that they would soon have a war with the Nazi's so they ordered Cellars and basements and air raid shelters. It was predicted that the future war could involve 600 tons of bombs per day, but however it involved 3500 tons of bombs each day. The government then also made plans of saving the children by evacuating them from the cities that would be targeted. The British government then decided to split the country into 3. One country heavy targeted one neutral and one that accepted evacuees. The British government had then a huge campaign trying persuading parents to evacuate the children. Many parents didn't want to let their children go they thought that some children couldn't be looked after in the other countries. Some children were evacuated and some weren't, but why was the British Government so determined to evacuate so many children? Many people would still remember the destruction of World War One and they would also remember the bombing and havoc that came because of this. ...read more.

Middle

This campaign was successful as the working rate of woman improved significantly. Woman did work such as producing artillery to send to the lines. This was vital, because without the women working in the factories, Britain would simply not have been able to fight. The government also wanted to ensure a good future for Britain as a country, as they knew that many of the men were likely to be killed from fighting, they needed to keep someone in the country for after the war to run the shops, factories and other businesses. As Britain decided to evacuate children from the major cities in the early years of the Second World War, there were always children who weren't evacuated for several reasons; however the life the faced in the citied was not easy. Life in the cities was terrible. Children that went to school were trained for the war. The children had to paint the shelters to make it seem colorful and fun. Children also had their gas mask always with them. ...read more.

Conclusion

London was the main target but other major cities were also bombed. Casualties were high. On the first day of bombing 430 people were killed and 1,600 badly injured. Within a few weeks the daily bombing raids had become nightly raids. Hitler decided to make the bombing raids at night to increase the 'fear factor' and also to make people weaker by not allowing them to sleep properly. People in London slept in underground stations for protection. There were public shelters in most towns, but many people built Anderson shelters in their gardens so that they had protection if they were unable to get to the public shelter. Anderson shelters were made out of corrugated iron and were very strong. A hole was dug in the garden, then the shelter was placed in the hole and it was covered with earth. An air-raid siren warned people when a raid was about to begin. Overall evacuation was a good idea as it tried to protect the most valuable thing, which was the future generation and it also managed to teach city children the life and responsibilities of urban families. However it wasn't a great success. ...read more.

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