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Why did the British government evacuate children from major British cities during world war two?

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Introduction

Why did the British government evacuate children from major British cities during World War Two? At the start of world war two the British government organized the mass evacuation of children from the cities to the countryside. This meant that young children were sent away from there homes and families to stay with complete strangers. Doing that today would be unthinkable and it is clear how worried the British government must have been to take such drastic action. Most MPs at the time had served in World War One and understood how horrible war could be and did not want children to be involved in it. Hitler had demonstrated he would kill defenceless civilians in the Spanish civil war when he flattened the Spanish town of Guernica flattening 80% of the buildings and killing 1,685 people. In world war one the Germans had bombed a few coastal cities since then there technology had improved and they could easily terrorise cities across Britain. The leaders of Britain in 1938 were the soldiers of Britain 1914 and had witnessed the atrocities of World war One. After witnessing the horrors of war they knew that they had to get children out of danger. During WW1 184 bombs were dropped on great Britain killing 21 people. By WW2 technology had improved massively and Hitler could cause devastation across Britain. ...read more.

Middle

Citizens had been bombed before in Abysinia but its army was poorly developed and they had a very weak air force Spain however was a developed country with an airforce and they still could not defend themselves. The British government new that if Hitler would do this to a Spanish town he would do it to a British town. The British government made plans just in case Hitler did bomb British cities like the evacuation of children. However surely Hitler could be reasoned with? He might not want war with Britain, Perhaps Hitler only wanted to undo the unfair treaty of Versailes. In September 1938 Neville Chamberlain arrived in Britain after the Munich conference promising peace after surrendering the Sudetenland to Hitler who had sworn he had no more ambitions to gain land in Europe and he would never go to war with Britain. In March 1939 Hitler invaded Czechoslovakia. Churchill had attempted to adopt a policy of appeasement were he negotiated with Hitler and gave him what he wanted in the hope that he would not go any further. By invading Czechoslovakia Hitler proved that he could not be negotiated with or trusted and war was inevitable. In a meeting with the Czechoslovakian president he threatened to flatten Munich after which he passed out from shock and then surrendered, Hitler made the same threats to Chamberlain. ...read more.

Conclusion

By doing this Hitler hoped to cripple industry and weaken British morale, when the battle of Britain had been won British cities turned into a danger zone. On the September the 7th 1940 after failing to control the airspace above Britain Hitler changed tactics and started to bomb British cities. Up until the 10th of May 1941 the Luftwaffe sent bombers to British cities. What the government had predicted was true the Phoney war was over and everyday citizens were in mortal danger parents had to accept what the government had been telling them they had to get there children to safety in the country. Every night Hitler sent countless planes this made the British government see how powerful Hitler was and left them feeling like he had an unlimited supply of planes and men ready to lay down there lives. And if all that wasn't enough to convince parents spending the night in a tube station/ Anderson shelter with tired miserable children then trying to getting them to go to school the next day is probably very stressful especially every night. The British government knew that Hitler would bomb London he had means- after expanding his army and air force, motive- to win the war and make Germany strong and opportunity- after invading France. They knew there would be bombing raids over British cities and started preparing as soon as possible. The evacuation of British children from the cities to the country was an obvious decision. The biggest problem was to get parents to send away there children. ...read more.

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