• Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

Why did the desegregation of schools become a major problem in the USA during the 1950s?

Extracts from this document...

Introduction

Why did the desegregation of schools become a major problem in the USA during the 1950s? Desegregation of schools became a major problem in the USA in the 1950s. The views and feelings of the American public on the subject of segregation and the civil rights movement where very much divided, the southern states where mostly in favour of segregation where as in the North racism was far less entrenched into there society which caused there views to focus mainly on a pro African-American American and abolishing the policy although they were not without prejudice. The southern states protested that the north had no right to interfere with the south. The dispute was not only between the north and the south but also over the rights of the central federal government and what power it has over individual state governments. The state leaders of the south sided with the general opinion of continuing with segregation, as they knew that is what the majority of the white population in the southern states wanted. ...read more.

Middle

American factories began expanding production when war broke out in Europe creating many new jobs. At first Blacks were excluded from most of these jobs. The United States went on to fight World War II with a segregated military. Blacks and Whites kept in separate units. Blacks were normally used in support roles. Segregationists advanced the theory that Blacks were not capable soldiers. Many Black soldiers wondered about fighting racist NAZI Germany when they faced racism at home. (Many of the early NAZI actions against the Jews in Germany were based in on American Segregation laws.) And when they finally did return home there reception was far from welcoming, black Americans were still being treated with the same level of disrespect they faced before the war. The Civil Rights movement was strongly supported by Blacks in the North. This was not the case in the South. Poles in 1954 revealed that only slight more than half (53 percent) of Black Southerners supported school desegregation. Here I am not sure about the validity of these polls. ...read more.

Conclusion

Already quiet and advanced city in terms of segregation policies and progression in achieving desegregation. Little Rock was also one of the first to pass a law against segregation at its local high school. It also had great success in converting parks, library, zoo, buses and nearly all of its universities into a desegregated environment, and they planned to desegregate all schools in the space of a few years. The fact that a law banning segregation in Little Rocks high was in place did not mean there was no opposition to it; in fact most white people in Little Rock were against the prospect of a desegregated school. The nine African-Americans attempting to attend the high school encountered many difficulties such as racial abuse and attack. On Monday 23rd of September, the first day the school was to be desegregated, a mob of around 1000 people gathered around the school attempting to prevent the black students from entering. The events that took place in Little Rock clearly show how deeply entrenched racism was in America-especially the south-and why desegregation became such an increasing problem in the 1950s. Jake Taylor 1 ...read more.

The above preview is unformatted text

This student written piece of work is one of many that can be found in our GCSE USA 1941-80 section.

Found what you're looking for?

  • Start learning 29% faster today
  • 150,000+ documents available
  • Just £6.99 a month

Not the one? Search for your essay title...
  • Join over 1.2 million students every month
  • Accelerate your learning by 29%
  • Unlimited access from just £6.99 per month

See related essaysSee related essays

Related GCSE USA 1941-80 essays

  1. Civil Rights in the USA 1945-1975

    Lyndon Johnson, Elijah Muhammad, he helped Malcolm X become what he did, through the nation of Islam and also groups and protesters, with out them your argument would go nowhere. JF Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson had all the power to enforce new civil rights laws to the country.

  2. Was USA policy of containment a success?

    The Soviets pulled out of N. Korea in 1950, leaving a communist regime behind. That regime, funded and equipped by The Peoples Republic of China, invaded S. Korea. The United Nations (led, of course, by the United States)

  1. Why did the desegregation of schools become a major problem in the USA in ...

    A court injunction was filed against Faubus and he was forced to remove the troops, leaving the coast clear for a mob of 1,000 people to gather. The mob prevented the students from remaining at the school and President Eisenhower had to forcibly intervene.

  2. Civil Rights Why did the desegregation of schools become a major problem in the ...

    and black schools being so obvious, that Supreme Court announced such a rule. However, not many states accepted this judgement and continued to keep their school separate despite the expense of having schools for blacks and whites rather than mixed.

  1. The scope of this investigation is to discover the Rastafari movement mainly by considering ...

    And in enhancing the possibilities that the Organization may serve us better, we serve and bring closer our most cherished goals. "I would mention briefly today two particular issues, which are of deep concern to all men: disarmament and the establishment of true equality among men.

  2. Why did the desegregation of schools become a major problem in the USA in ...

    Although blacks outnumbered whites, the sharecropping system that basically replaced slavery helped ensure they remained poor and virtually locked out of any opportunity for land ownership or basic human rights. The system grew from the struggle between planters and ex-slaves on how to organize production.

  1. Why Did The Segregation Of Schools Become A Problem InThe USA In The 1950s

    The problem that lied ahead of civil rights activists was not getting laws passed it was getting southern white's to accept them. The main problem was that most southern states believed that the supreme court was out of touch with the realities of southern life, one southern judge said "Black

  2. Why did the desegregation of schools become a major problem in the USA in ...

    Congress should have pushed desegregation forward instead of leaving it and creating more problems for schools desegregating. Southern State governors were outraged with Brown vs. Topeka case because they thought it was changing southern way of life.

  • Over 160,000 pieces
    of student written work
  • Annotated by
    experienced teachers
  • Ideas and feedback to
    improve your own work