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Why Did The Nazis Treatment Of The Jews Change From 1939-1945?

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Introduction

Why Did The Nazis Treatment Of The Jews Change From 1939-1945? In 1938, Hitler built up his army and in March the following year, he invaded Poland, Austria and Czechoslovakia. These three countries were extremely important for the Nazi term of Lebensraum. Lebensraum was a term, which meant living space. However, this space was only meant for the Aryan race. This didn't include the many Jews in the countries Hitler wanted to take over. He was already trying to control this "inferior" race in Germany and now he had even more. In 1939 and onwards, the Nazis thought up many methods on how they were going to control the accumulating number of Jews in their empire. In Poland alone there were around five million Jews. To solve the problem of the substantial increase in the number of Jews, the Nazis had to introduce new methods to control them. ...read more.

Middle

In some Ghettos, the inhabitants were fed as little as 180 calories a day. As the Ghettos were already overflowing with what the Nazis would consider as undesirables, they had to find new ways of controlling them. They decided to put them into concentration camps. These camps were very similar to the Ghettos, because they were used to control them. However, many more of these were built to combat the massive population of Jews. These camps were located near the centre of the German empire mainly to stop opposing forces from knowing their whereabouts. Another reason for being close to the centre of their empire was because Poland was there. Poland had the largest Jewish population in their empire. If most of the concentration camps were located near most of the Jews, the Nazis wouldn't have to spend too much money or time on transporting them. ...read more.

Conclusion

The back of the vans, where the Jews were kept, was airtight and the fumes from the vans would go into them. The Jews were told that they were going to be resettled in the east. Instead, they were gassed with carbon monoxide. However this proved too slow and the Nazis had to change their methods again. On January 20th 1942, an important meeting between fifteen high-ranking officers took place. One of these officers was Reinhard Heydrich, and another was Adolf Eichmann who played a major part in the conference. It was staged in Wannsee later to be known as the Wannsee conference. This was where the "Final Solution" was revealed to the world. It was where the agreement of the systematic extermination of the Jews took place. It was where the Nazis agreed the deportation of all Jews in German owned Europe to a destination where they would never return. Adam Georgiou 10C3 Holocaust Project ...read more.

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