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Why Did the Nazis treatment Of the Jews change from 1939-1945?

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Introduction

Why Did the Nazis treatment Of the Jews change from 1939-1945? > > In this essay I will be trying to why did the Nazis treatment of the Jews change from 1939-1945. > > On the first of September 1939 under the secret Nazi-soviet pact the Soviet Union agreed to advance into Poland and in return they would get the eastern half of Poland only in return for his neutrality, Josef Stalin agreed this. On September 17 advanced to an agreed line that cut Poland in half. After a tenacious defence against the German forces around it Warsaw surrendered on September 27. Over a million Jews were left on the eastern side and about another quarter of a million were kicked over by the Germans, many of these survived. These Jews were then sent to Soviet central or to labour camps in Siberia. While the war was on many of them enlisted in the Polish forces. ...read more.

Middle

Tens of thousands of Jews were also expelled from Germany into Poland. The deportees were sent in locked passenger trains under SS armed guard. Germans took their homes and property. Many children froze to death on the journey. Adolf Eichmenn met the deportees on arrival and told them: "There are no apartments and no houses - if you build your homes you will have a roof over your head. There is no water. The wells are full of epidemics. There's cholera, dysentery, and typhus. If you dig for water, you'll have water." German soldiers then opened their luggage and took whatever they wanted. Jews were forced to live in these ghettos for 3 years each year the death rate getting higher mostly from starvation. > > In 1941 we saw the Einsatzgrupen. There Job was to follow the German armies through the USSR and once the German army had finished with the town they would kill all of the Jewish families. ...read more.

Conclusion

In the summer of 1942 the concentration camp Auschwitz which had until then been a place where Poles had been held and killed was turned by the SS into another Death camp the largest of them all. At Auschwitz they experimented using different forms of gas and different ways of murder. For the next two and a half years Auschwitz became the most brutal of all camps and killed the majority of arrivals imediattly. If the doctor on site(even though he never cured any Jewish people) thought that a Jewish person was capable of hard labour they would be tattooed with a number and sent to the barracks. > > Over these brief years we can see the way the Nazis killed the Jews these methods got worse and worse as the years went on. These different methods changed because the Nazis had to think of cheap but quick ways of getting rid of mass amounts of people. Hence why they came up with the idea of using Zykon B gas to kill the Jews in the end. ...read more.

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